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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Harrisburg High School and Former John Harris High School

 
 
Harrisburg High School and Former John Harris High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 28, 2016
1. Harrisburg High School and Former John Harris High School Marker
Inscription.  Harrisburg's explosive growth after World War I opened new lands for development, both uptown above Maclay Street, and on Allison Hill east of 18th Street. Prior to that time, the Technical and Central High Schools, on Walnut and Forster Streets respectively downtown, served the educational needs of an older Harrisburg. Then the Harrisburg School Board decided in the early 1920’s to erect two new high school complexes: one at the city’s northern end (William Penn High School) and the other at its eastern end (John Harris High School) to serve the community’s burgeoning school-age population. Both schools were completed and opened in September, 1926. Designed by the respected Harrisburg architectural collaboration of Tappley and Hornbostel, the former John Harris High School is an unusual interpretation of the Italian Renaissance Revival architecture style. It occupies lands originally intended for the continued residential development of adjacent Bellevue Park, but which were sold to the School District for the obvious greater benefit to the neighborhood and city. Both the John Harris and William Penn High Schools continued as separate secondary
Harrisburg High School and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 28, 2016
2. Harrisburg High School and Marker
The marker is visible here to the left of the driveway.
facilities and particularly as sports rivals until 1972, when the two were administratively merged into a single city-wide high school entity, with John Harris serving grades nine through twelve. Subsequent District restructurings resulted in the renaming of the John Harris campus as the Harrisburg High School with the former William Penn High School serving as the District’s vocational technical center. Further recent progressive efforts have positioned both schools to achieve distinction in providing the city’s youth a quality education in the 21st Century.

Captions:
1926 view from Reservoir Park looking southeast showing the just-completed John Harris High School and surrounding not-yet developed rural lands.

1930 postcard view of John Harris High School.

The Harrisburg History Project commissioned by Mayor Stephen R. Reed.
 
Location. 40° 16.304′ N, 76° 50.906′ W. Marker is in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker is at the intersection of Market Street and Hale Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Market Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2451 Market Street, Harrisburg PA 17103, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Explore the Capital Area Greenbelt (approx. ¼ mile away); Bishop McDevitt High School (approx. 0.3 miles away); Bellevue Park
Harrisburg High School / Former John Harris High School image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 28, 2016
3. Harrisburg High School / Former John Harris High School
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Moment of Mercy (approx. 0.4 miles away); Breeze Hill (approx. half a mile away); Mansion at Reservoir Park (approx. 0.6 miles away); Reservoir Park (approx. 0.6 miles away); Harrisburg (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harrisburg.
 
Categories. Education
 

More. Search the internet for Harrisburg High School and Former John Harris High School.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 11, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 38 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 11, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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