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Westworth Village in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Plant No. 4

 
 
Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Plant No. 4 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 9, 2019
1. Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Plant No. 4 Marker
Inscription.  Prior to World War II, the U.S. aircraft industry focused primarily on producing aircraft for civilian airlines; few manufacturers specialized in military airplane construction. In the fall of 1940, the War Department determined that expected future demand for military aircraft required new defense plants, not just expansion of existing sites. This form of home front industry and the application of its product toward strategic aerial bombing grew grew exponentially as a primary weapon toward defeating an enemy's ability to wage war.

Although involved in pilot training, Texas had no large-scale role in aircraft manufacturing at this time. As America recovered from the Great Depression while moving closer to war, the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce aggressively campaigned Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation (Convair) for a new plant. Their efforts proved successful and groundbreaking ceremonies took place here on April 18, 1941. The Austin Company of Cleveland, Ohio, built Convair Plant No. 4 in less than a year and the first B-24 (Liberator) bomber rolled off the assembly line on April 17, 1942 - 100 days ahead of schedule.
Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Plant No. 4 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 9, 2019
2. Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Plant No. 4 Marker
More than 3,000 heavy bombers were produced here with a peak wartime employment of 32,000. The site also converted B-24 airframes into C-87 cargo/transports (Liberator Express), and later in the war, produced a limited number of the new B-32 heavy bombers (Dominator).

Wartime mobilization was an important factor in the eventual Allied victory during World War II. This and other home front industries had a major impact on the local economy. Industrial growth brought new employers and workers to the community and added a modern industrial aspect to Fort Worth's existing Texas frontier reputation.

Texas in World War II - 2008

 
Erected 2008 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 14057.)
 
Location. 32° 45.758′ N, 97° 26.738′ W. Marker is in Westworth Village, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker is on Lockheed Boulevard (State Highway 341 Spur) 0.2 miles north of White Settlement Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Worth TX 76108, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Worth Army Air Field (approx. 1 miles away); Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. (approx. 1 miles away); Curzon Place (approx. 2.9 miles away); Camp Bowie Boulevard
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(approx. 4 miles away); Camp Bowie in World War I (approx. 4 miles away); Midnight (approx. 4.7 miles away); Herbert M. Hinckley (approx. 4.8 miles away); Southwestern Exposition and Livestock Show (approx. 4.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Westworth Village.
 
Also see . . .  Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on August 14, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Air & SpaceIndustry & CommerceWar, World II
 

More. Search the internet for Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Plant No. 4.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 14, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 14, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 14, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.
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