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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington Park in St. Mary's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II

 
 
McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 30, 2019
1. McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II Marker
Inscription.  
The First Modern Strike Fighter As the direct descendent of the disappointing F3H Demon, the F-4's success was anything but assured. But, with over 5000 F-4s of various versions ultimately delivered to the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force, and 11 foreign countries as well, the F-4 proved to be its era's premier strike fighter. A huge payload gave the F-4 a formidable attack capability, and the two-man crew, powerful engines, and advanced radar made the F-4 a potent fighter as well. The F-4J version, an example of which is before you, was the world's first fighter able to detect and attack low-flying aircraft. In the Vietnam War, Navy Phantoms claimed 40 air-air victories, against a loss of seven F-4s to enemy fighters. Of note is that Navy and Marine Corps F-4s lacked guns, relying solely on AIM-9 Sidewinder and AIM-7 Sparrow air-to-air missiles.

Our Display Aircraft F-4J Bureau Number 153071 spent its career at NAS Patuxent River. It first flew on 28 June 1966 and was transferred to the Naval Air Test Center in February 1967. It served primarily as the carrier suitability and Automatic Carrier
McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 30, 2019
2. McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II
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Landing System test aircraft. Over its life, our Phantom logged 4,256.1 flight hours, 447 catapult launches, 533 arrested landings, and 8,655 total landings. It was retired in October 1986 and transferred to PRNAM in March 1987.

• Primary Mission: Fighter/attack
• Crew: Pilot and Radar Intercept Officer
• U.S. Service Timeline (F-4 Series): 1960 - 1992
• Max. Gross Weight: 56,000 lb
• Dimensions: 58.3 ft length, 38.4 ft wing span
• Propulsion: Two General Electric J79-GE-10 Turbojet engines
• Max. Operating Speed: 725 MPH (sea level); Mach 2.1 (above 30,000 ft)
• Armament: AIM-7, AIM-9 air-to-air missiles; up to 16,000 lb air-to-surface bombs, rockets, missiles


This aircraft is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola, Florida

 
Erected by Patuxent River Naval Air Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Air & SpaceMilitaryWar, Vietnam. A significant historical month for this entry is February 1967.
 
Location. 38° 16.547′ N, 76° 27.73′ W. Marker is in Lexington Park, Maryland, in St. Mary's County. Marker can be reached from Three Notch Road (Maryland Route
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235) just north of Buse Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 22156 Three Notch Road, Lexington Park MD 20653, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. North American RA-5C Vigilante (a few steps from this marker); LTV NA-7A Corsair II (a few steps from this marker); The F9F-8B “Cougar” (a few steps from this marker); Grumman NF-14D Tomcat (a few steps from this marker); AIM-9H Sidewinder Missile (a few steps from this marker); Grumman A-6E Intruder (a few steps from this marker); McDonnell Douglas F/A-18A Hornet (a few steps from this marker); Mk-82 500-lb Snakeye Bomb (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 31, 2019. It was originally submitted on August 31, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 68 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 31, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Jul. 26, 2021