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Lexington Park in St. Mary's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Grumman A-6E Intruder

 
 
Grumman A-6E Intruder Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 30, 2019
1. Grumman A-6E Intruder Marker
Inscription.  
All-Weather Attack, Day or Night Grumman's A-6 Intruder was designed around a powerful air-to-surface radar. The final version, the A-6E, also featured an infrared/laser multi-sensor. In adverse conditions, these radar and optical systems allowed an Intruder crew to navigate to a target over difficult terrain, at low altitudes and high speeds. Multiple A-6 variants were produced, including KA-6D tankers and EA-6A/EA-6B electronic warfare aircraft. Intruders flew thousands of combat missions in Vietnam and Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Never authorized for sale to foreign countries, Intruders were only flown by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps.

Our Display Aircraft Bureau Number 156997 first flew in December 1969 as an A-6A and served with several fleet squadrons. After being converted to an A-6E, our Intruder rejoined the fleet, but later went to operational test squadron VX-5 at Pt. Mugu, CA. With VX-5, the aircraft tested mission system upgrades. In October 1984, our Intruder was transferred to NATC's Strike Aircraft Test Directorate, where its mission system upgrade role continued. Its final flight
Grumman A-6E Intruder image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 30, 2019
2. Grumman A-6E Intruder
was on 29 July 1993. Our Intruder came to PRNAM in April 1995 after logging 4789 flight hours, 780 catapult launches, 787 arrested landings, and 6,287 total landings.

Primary Mission: All-Weather Attack
Crew: One Pilot, one Bombardier-Navigator
U.S. Service Timeline (A-6 Series): 1963 - 1997
Dimensions: 54.8 ft length, 53.0 ft wing span
Max. Gross Weight: 60,400 lb
Propulsion: Two Pratt & Whitney J52-P-8 turbojets
Max. Operating Speed: 647 MPH (sea level)
Armament: Up to 17,200 pounds of bombs, rockets, and missiles


This aircraft is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola, Florida

 
Erected by Patuxent River Naval Air Museum.
 
Location. 38° 16.557′ N, 76° 27.735′ W. Marker is in Lexington Park, Maryland, in St. Mary's County. Marker can be reached from Three Notch Road (Maryland Route 235) just north of Buse Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 22156 Three Notch Road, Lexington Park MD 20653, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Northrop Grumman EA-6B Prowler (here, next to this marker); LTV NA-7A Corsair II (a few steps
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from this marker); Sikorsky CH-53A Sea Stallion (a few steps from this marker); North American RA-5C Vigilante (a few steps from this marker); McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II (a few steps from this marker); Douglas NA-4M Skyhawk (a few steps from this marker); The F9F-8B “Cougar” (a few steps from this marker); Grumman F-9J Cougar (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington Park.
 
Categories. Air & SpaceMilitaryWar, 1st Iraq & Desert StormWar, Vietnam
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on September 1, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 1, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 1, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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