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Waterloo in Monroe County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Garretson Home

229 South Main

 

— Waterloo, Monroe Co. Ill., Laid Out in 1818 —

 
The Garretson Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Smith, November 2, 2019
1. The Garretson Home Marker
Inscription.  The Garretson Home was built in 1852 as a family home in the Italianate style, by William C. Garretson, a prominent figure in the history of Monroe County. William Garretson was a direct relative of James Garretson, one of the founding fathers of Bellefontaine in 1781. After two years of inhabiting the property, William Garretson granted the property to Martin Schilling for $1,750.00.

Martin Schilling, along with his wife, Anna Maria Hoock, and six children: Louis, Joseph, Nicholas, Martin III, Martha and Matthew, moved to Waterloo from Millstadt when they bought the home in 1854. The family lived on the first floor and he operated a tavern and dance hall on the second floor.

In 1871, at the age of 23, their son, Martin Schilling III passed away. In the subsequent three years, Louis Schilling and his wife Brigit also passed away leaving behind four children that were adopted by brother, Nicholas Schilling. Martin Sr.'s wife, Anna Marie, also passed away in 1875 at the age of 56 due to winter fever. Then three years later in December of 1878, Martin Sr. was killed at his tavern as a result of a bar fight caused over a bottle
The Garretson Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Smith, November 2, 2019
2. The Garretson Home Marker
of wine. One year later, Nicholas Schilling was robbed and stabbed to death on his way to St. Louis. After these dramatic events, the family fell apart, sold the property to Louis Eilbracht and moved away from Waterloo.

Mr. Eilbracht owned the property for thirty-six years, then sold it to William T. Demint who subsequently sold the property to David M. Hardy. Mr. Hardy was another prominent figure in the history of Monroe County due to his relation to James Moore, one of the original founding fathers. David was a well-known, hard-working member of the community. He served on the school board and helped organize Harrisonville Telephone Company and Commercial State Bank of Waterloo. David and William were successful business partners for years, but eventually sold the property to the Quernheim family.

Balthasar Quernheim (also known as Heinrich Quernheim) started Quernheim's Furniture Store in Maeystown, IL in 1858. As a skilled cabinetmaker, he was called upon to make coffins, which resulted in the beginning of a funeral home business. Upon his death in 1898, Balthasar's son, Henry Quernheim Jr. moved the business to Waterloo.

A few years later, William and Hermann Quernheim were asked to help run the funeral home. Hermann continued to run the business until his death in 1928, after which, his sons Emil and Albert, along with Henry Jr.'s son, Arthur,
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formed a partnership known as the H. Quernheim Company. After Arthur's death in 1951, Emil and Albert continued the business until 1969 when Albert sold his share to Emil. He continued operations with his sons David and Paul.

Emil passed away in 1979 and David and Paul formed a new professional corporation that was widely known as the Quernheim Funeral Home. After generations of ownership of this building on Market Street, moved the business there in 1988 and sold the 229 South Main to Larry and Sandra Hurley, to be used as a residential home. The Hurley's later sold the property to David Kahn in 1992.

David was an attorney who used the bottom floor as a law office and the top floor as residential property. David and his wife, Elaine sold the property to Floyd E. Crowder in April 1997. Mr. Crowder subsequently sold to Monroe County Title Co., who then remodeled the entire first and second floors, removing an old spiral staircase and gutting the entire building to create a more business-like environment, and have been operating in this building ever since.

Researched by Gibault students Lauren and Monica Shuler
 
Erected 2016 by Waterloo Beautication Committee.
 
Location. 38° 20.051′ N, 90° 9.008′ W.
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Marker is in Waterloo, Illinois, in Monroe County. Marker is on South Main Street just north of East 4th Street (Illinois Route 156), on the left when traveling north. Near Beantree Cafe and Waterloo City Hall. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 229 South Main Street, Waterloo IL 62298, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Henry's Grocery (a few steps from this marker); Waterloo City Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Harrisonville Telephone Company (within shouting distance of this marker); The Braun Property (within shouting distance of this marker); The Odd Fellows Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Adelsberger House (about 400 feet away); Monroe County Bicentennial Bandstand (about 400 feet away); The Küenster Building (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waterloo.
 
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Credits. This page was last revised on November 3, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 1, 2019. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 2, 2019, by Thomas Smith of Waterloo, Ill. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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