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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Tehachapi in Kern County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Cross at the Loop

 
 
The Cross at the Loop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, September 21, 2019
1. The Cross at the Loop Marker
Inscription.  
In memory of conductor Everett S. Crown, brakeman Allan R. Riess, who lost their lives in a tragic train wreck in San Bernardino Calif. May 12, 1989.

Erected by employees and S.P.T.C.O.
 
Erected by Southern Pacific Railroad.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: DisastersRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 35° 11.948′ N, 118° 32.285′ W. Marker is near Tehachapi, California, in Kern County. Marker can be reached from Broome Road 0.3 miles north of Woodford-Tehachapi Road, on the left when traveling north. Located at the Tehachapi Loop, on private property. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Keene CA 93531, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tehachapi Loop (approx. 0.3 miles away); Tehachapi Pass Railroad Line (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Great Flood of 1932 and Engine No. 3834 (approx. one mile away); Cesar E. Chavez National Monument (approx. 2.1 miles away); Nüwa - Kawaiisu People (approx. 4.3 miles
The Cross at the Loop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, September 21, 2019
2. The Cross at the Loop Marker
A bench near the tracks faces the marker and the cross.
away); "Old Town" (approx. 4.6 miles away); Duty~Honor~Country (approx. 6.8 miles away); Tehachapi Loop Mural (approx. 6.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tehachapi.
 
Regarding The Cross at the Loop. On May 12, 1989, at 7:30 am, an out-of-control Southern Pacific freight train speeding down the Cajon Pass derailed at a curve in San Bernardino. It was more than 3,000 tons heavier than estimated, and some of the brake systems were not working. The conductor could not slow the train as it approached a bend in the tracks adjacent to the Duffy Street neighborhood. The train was going more than 90 mph in a 40 mph zone when it derailed. The careening cars destroyed 7 homes, killing 2 trainmen, and 2 children in their home.

Two weeks later, a gasoline pipeline near the tracks erupted in flames hundreds of feet high, spraying 300,000 gallons of burning fuel onto homes and streets, killing 2 more residents and destroying 11 more homes. The pipeline had been damaged by the cleanup crews’ heavy equipment.

After the accidents, the railroad bought the homes that were damaged or destroyed, promising to turn the land into a memorial park. Thirty years later, this
The Cross image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, September 21, 2019
3. The Cross
On a hilltop within the Loop.
has still not happened.
 
The Cross image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, September 21, 2019
4. The Cross
With a string of lights wrapped around it, and a freight train in the Loop.
Marker at the Cross image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, September 21, 2019
5. Marker at the Cross
May 12, 1989 — In loving memory of Everett S. Crown and Allan R. Reiss. — And to all who have given their lives for the Mountain Divisions of the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe Railroads.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 20, 2019. It was originally submitted on September 23, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 139 times since then and 77 times this year. Last updated on October 20, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 23, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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Nov. 23, 2020