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Coventry in Tolland County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The First Congregational Church

 
 
The First Congregational Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 6, 2019
1. The First Congregational Church Marker
Inscription.  
The First Congregational Church
This classic pillared New England Congregational Church was built in 1849 as the Village Church at a cost of $10,491. For a period of 20 years there were two Congregational Churches in South Coventry. One was the original church at the green on Lake and High Street, organized in 1712. The other was this location in the village. Neither thrived and on January 6, 1869. the two were reunited as the First Church of Coventry. In 1901, by vote of the membership, the First Church of Coventry became the First Congregational Church of Coventry.

Over the almost three centuries of faithful witness in Coventry, the church has been served by thirty-one pastors. Its first was the longest tenured. The Reverend Mr. Joseph Meacham served this church for forty years, from 1712 to 1752. The Reverend Dr. Joseph Huntington enjoyed a lengthy pastorate from 1763-1794. The Reverend Dr. Huntington prepared Nathan Hale for his classes at Yale College. The Reverend Mr. Chauncy Booth also had a long pastorate, serving from 1815-1844. The Hale Family has a long association with this church. In 1804 the "Hale Donation"
The First Congregational Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 6, 2019
2. The First Congregational Church Marker
was created by the last will and testament of Sarah Hale, widow of John Hale, Esq. Her bequest of $3,330.33 has grown and still enables grants to be given for the education of students in the Christian Ministry or missionary endeavors, at Yale Divinity School, Andover Newton Theological Seminary, Hartford Seminary and many other schools. The first grants were for $50.00. Today the grants are for several thousand dollars. The church grounds have increased since 1969 with the purchase of adjoining properties. The crowning achievement of the expansion was the construction of the Center for Christian Education and Social Hall (1985-87). This addition stands in testimony to the churches mission of worship services for all, christian education programs, missions for hope and a sense of community for all those that walk through its doors.

Reverend Chauncey Booth
The Reverend Chauncy Booth was born in Coventry in 1783. He graduated from Vale in 1810 and went directly to Anderson Theological Seminary. He was ordained on September 20, 1815 and accepted a call to the ministry in Coventry. He served as Minister for this church from 1815 until 1844 and he died in Coventry in 1851. His grandson, Henry Farnum Dimock, bequeathed funds in 1911 to the South Coventry Library Association for a new library. In 1912-13 the Booth & Dimock Memorial Library was built and dedicated.
The First Congregational Church of Coventry image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 6, 2019
3. The First Congregational Church of Coventry
This Property Has Been
Placed on the
National Register
of Historic Places
by the United States
Department of the Interior
Built 1849


( photo captions )
- On March 19, 1903 the steeple of this church was destroyed by lightening. It was repaired for the sum of $5,605.63, which was covered by insurance. This picture postcard was taken as restoration was in progress.
- The church, in this 1909 postcard, with the repaired steeple and straighteden pillars. Church Lane, which lead to the homes at the back of the church, can be seen to the left. This road was closed when additional parking and driveway was made available to the right hand side of the church.
- Early 1900’s view of Main Street, J.S. Champlin became Burnam’s Store. It was bought by the church in 1972 and torn down. The home to the left of the store was bought by the church in 1984. It was moved to the back of thre church and became apartments. A large parking lot was created for the church in the 1980’s.
 
Location. 41° 46.077′ N, 72° 18.011′ W. Marker is in Coventry, Connecticut, in Tolland County. Marker is on Main Street (Connecticut Route 31) 0.2 miles east of Monument Hill Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Coventry CT 06238, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Washburn Mill & The Visitor’s Center (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Wellwood’s General Store / The Methodist Church (about 500
The First Congregational Church of Coventry image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 6, 2019
4. The First Congregational Church of Coventry
feet away); South Coventry Village (about 600 feet away); Booth and Dimock Memorial Library (about 600 feet away); The Tracy Shoddy Mill (about 700 feet away); E.A. Tracy Wool Extract and Shoddy Mill (about 700 feet away); Thomas H. Wood’s Silk Mill (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named South Coventry Village (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coventry.
 
Also see . . .  The First Congregational Church of Coventry. (Submitted on November 10, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 

More. Search the internet for The First Congregational Church.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 10, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 38 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 10, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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