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Near Havre in Hill County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Fort Assinniboine

 
 
Fort Assinniboine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2019
1. Fort Assinniboine Marker
Inscription.  Established in 1879, Fort Assinniboine was one of the most strategically-placed U.S. Army posts in the northwest. Headquarters for the District of Montana, the fort and military reserve encompassed the entire Bears Paw mountain range. The 18th U.S. Infantry under the command of Colonel Thomas Ruger constructed the post with brick manufactured nearby. When completed, the fort's substantial brick buildings included officer's quarters, barracks, a large hospital, chapel, gymnasium, officer's club, stables, and warehouses. The U.S. Army intended the fort to protect settlers to the south from possible raids by Sitting Bull's Hunkpapa Sioux, who fled to Canada after Custer's defeat on the Little Big Horn in 1876. The military's fears proved groundless, however, as no serious Indian disturbance occurred in the area.
General John J. Pershing served here in the 1890s, earning his nickname "Black Jack" because of his association with the Afro-American 10th Cavalry - the famed "Buffalo Soldiers." For many years, Fort Assinniboine soldiers worked with the Canadian Mounties to control smuggling across the border.
The War Department abandoned the
Fort Assinniboine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2019
2. Fort Assinniboine Marker
post in 1911. A few years later, the landless Chippewa and Cree Indians found a home on the southern part of the military reserve when it was set aside as Rocky Boy's Reservation. The State of Montana purchased the fort's remaining buildings and 2,000 acres for use as the Northern Agricultural Research Center of Montana State University - Bozeman.
 
Erected by Montana Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 48° 30.448′ N, 109° 47.905′ W. Marker is near Havre, Montana, in Hill County. Marker is on U.S. 87 near 82nd Avenue West, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Havre MT 59501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Non-Commissioned Officers' Quarters (approx. half a mile away); John A. Burns (approx. 0.6 miles away); Fort Assiniboine (approx. 0.6 miles away); Guardhouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Assinniboine (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Assinniboine (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Assinniboine (approx. 0.6 miles away); Company Officer's Quarters (Duplexes) (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Havre.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Assinniboine -- Fort Assinniboine Preservation Association.
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THE FORT, one of northern Montana’s earliest outposts, was a busy self contained city. Bakery, laundry, a barbershop and blacksmith facilities were in operation, as were a general store, post office, hotel, and restaurant. For recreation, the post band gave regular concerts, and the men engaged in such sport activities as baseball, track, and boxing. Other diversions offered included a library for reading, card playing, and checkers, plus an enlisted men’s amusement center housed in the regimental band barracks. The lifestyle was routine, with the men largely spared from battle activity. (Submitted on November 13, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Assinniboine.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 13, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 35 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 13, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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