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Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Hanson

 
 
John Hanson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 1, 2020
1. John Hanson Marker
Inscription.  
Articles of Confederation

To all to who these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names send greeting. Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.


John Hanson First President of the Original United States Government

John Hanson, the first president of the United States under the Articles of Confederation, died at Oxon Hill Manor, once located on this site, on November 22, 1783, while he and his wife, Jane Hanson, were visiting their nephew. Thomas Hanson.

When delegates of the newly chartered government convened on November 5, 1781, as their first acts they elected Maryland delegate John Hanson President and legislated that "the President takes precedent of all and every person in the United States." Days later, George Washington congratulated Hanson "on your appointment to fill the most important seat in the United
John Hanson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 1, 2020
2. John Hanson Marker
States." Hanson served the 1781-82 presidential term. The government formed under the Articles of Confederation was the predecessor to the United States government formed under the Constitution.

Chosen for his skill bridging others' differences, Hanson had twice kept the nation whole by forging unanimous ratification of the Declaration of Independence, and later the Articles of Confederation. Unlike all other presidents, Hanson inherited not a functioning government, but a blank slate. His admiration successfully launched the government and the forerunners of today's Departments of State, Treasury, and Defense, and the Postal Service, Federal Reserve Bank, and Consular Service. National customs begun by the Hanson administration include the Great Seal, presidential portrait, presidential home and staff, First Ladies, and official observances of Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July.

President Hanson's descendants and their spouses include Senate and House members, a Supreme Court Chief Justice, Maryland Chief Justice, Maryland Chancellor, George Washington presidential electors, United States Centennial Commissioner, first Congressional Page, a national book prize winner, a bank president, and military officers from the Revolution to Viet Nam.

When John Hanson died, he was laid to rest in the Addison family crypt, which was found
John Hanson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
3. John Hanson
This c. 1770 portrait of John Hanson by John Hesselius hangs in Maryland Historical Society Museum in Baltimore.
intact but empty in 1971. The crypt was demolished in 1987. The whereabouts of John Hanson's remains are unknown, the fate of no other president. Jane Hanson survived John by 29 years and is buried in Frederick, Maryland, near the site of the couples home, also gone. The John Hanson National Memorial and Jane Hanson National Memorial are located in Frederick, Maryland.

Oxon Hill Manor

Oxon Hill Manor was the longtime home of the Addison family, who came to acquire several thousand acres of land along the Potomac River during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Hanson as a distant relative and frequently visited members of the Addison Family living at Oxon Hill.
 
Erected by National Harbor.
 
Location. 38° 47.82′ N, 77° 0.223′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on MGM National Avenue just west of Oxon Hill Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Addison Family at National Harbor (here, next to this marker); Free African Americans of Oxon Hill (here, next to this marker); "Salubria" (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named John Hanson
Jane Hanson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
4. Jane Hanson
date unknown, Portrait Courtesy of John Hanson Memorial Association
Close-up of image on marker
(approx. mile away); Judah and Resistance (approx. mile away); Salubria Changed the Future of the Potomac Valley (approx. mile away); Slavery in the Potomac Valley (approx. 0.3 miles away); Dr. John H. Bayne: A Leader In His Community (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Categories. Government & Politics
 
Oxon Hill Manor House image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
5. Oxon Hill Manor House
From One Hundred Years Ago; or, The Life and Times of Rev. Walter Dulany Addison, 1769-1848 by Elizabeth Hesselius Murray, 1895.
John Hanson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
6. John Hanson
circa 1781 by Charles Willson Peale.
Close-up of image on marker
Great Seal 1782 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
7. Great Seal 1782
Close-up of photo on marker
 

More. Search the internet for John Hanson.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 15, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on January 6, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on January 8, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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