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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Camden in Camden County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Enslaved Africans Once Sold Here

 
 
Enslaved Africans Sold Here image. Click for full size.
By Clem Murray, November 2017
1. Enslaved Africans Sold Here
Altered image of mounted marker courtesy of the Philadephia Inquirer.
Inscription.  Enslaved Africans Once Sold Here-African slavery in New Jersey began with early European settlement. By 1766, circa 800 captive people had been sold here at Coopers Street Ferry and two other near ferry landings. In Africa, approximately 24 million men, women and children marched to coastal prisons. Only half survived the journey. These 12 million survivors then endured deplorable conditions on the Middle Passage ocean crossing, where an additional 2 million died from disease, malnutrition, dehydration, drowning, suicide and abuse. By 1800, New Jersey enslaved African population exceeded 12,000. New Jersey was the last Northern state to emancipate, adopting gradual abolition in 1804 and finally ratifying in the 13th Amendment on January 23, 1866.
 
Erected 2018 by Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project. (Marker Number 1 of 3.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansIndustry & Commerce. A significant historical year for this entry is 1761.
 
Location. 39° 56.865′ N, 75° 7.49′ W. Marker is in Camden
Camden Middle Passage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, March 14, 2020
2. Camden Middle Passage Marker
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, New Jersey, in Camden County. Marker is at the intersection of North 2nd Street and Cooper Street, on the left when traveling north on North 2nd Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Camden NJ 08102, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Edward Sharpe House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Cooper Family (within shouting distance of this marker); Cooper's Ferry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Daniel Cooper Ferry Hotel (about 400 feet away); The Victor (about 700 feet away); The Campbell Kids (approx. 0.2 miles away); Benjamin Franklin Bridge (approx. ¼ mile away); L-3 Communications (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Camden.
 
More about this marker. There are several identical copies of this marker throughout Camden.
 
Regarding Enslaved Africans Once Sold Here. By 1766, Camden merchants had sold more than 800 captive Africans at three local ferry terminals owned by the Cooper family. They were often people not off-loaded in Philadelphia and ferried across the Delaware River to Camden’s auction sites. This served as one of the primary locations purchases made by surrounding local farmers and Delaware plantations. Three historical markers have been installed at the Cooper ferry terminals.
 
Also see . . .
1. Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project. (Submitted on February 9, 2020, by John Bloomfield of Palm Coast, Florida.)
2. MPCPMP Dedication on YouTube
Camden Middle Passage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, March 14, 2020
3. Camden Middle Passage Marker
. (Submitted on February 9, 2020, by John Bloomfield of Palm Coast, Florida.)
3. In Camden, a Memorial Marks Where Slaves Were Brought Ashore, NY Times. (Submitted on February 10, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Additional keywords. Middle Passage; human trafficking
 
Table for Camden Middle Passage Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Bloomfield, February 2020
4. Table for Camden Middle Passage Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 8, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 9, 2020, by John Bloomfield of Palm Coast, Florida. This page has been viewed 92 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 9, 2020, by John Bloomfield of Palm Coast, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on March 15, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4. submitted on February 9, 2020, by John Bloomfield of Palm Coast, Florida. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 17, 2021