Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lakeview in Lake County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Balloon Bomb

 
 
Balloon Bomb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 21, 2020
1. Balloon Bomb Marker
Inscription.  Very near here on a warm spring day in 1945, six people—a woman and five children— were killed by a Japanese “balloon bomb” or Fugo. The group had just arrived for a picnic when they discovered the deflated balloon. While they were gathered around the strange device, it exploded. Within a few weeks, word spread through the community that this bomb was no fluke; there had been others, and there could be more.

Despite the intensity of the attack and the success of the devices themselves, (nearly 10,000 were launched, and at least 300 made it across the Pacific), the mission was ultimately a failure. Few bombs did any real damage; most detonated over remote areas in the wettest time of the year.

Launched from 6,000 miles away in Japan, and deployed in retaliation for US bombing raids on Japanese soil, Fugo were the world's first intercontinental weapons. The Japanese military hoped the squadrons of these silent killers, wafting in from the ocean, would create terror and panic.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, World II. A significant historical year for this entry is 1945.
 
Location.
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 21, 2020
2. Photo Displayed on Marker
The US government's code name for the Fugo balloon bombs was “paper”--a reference to the scattered bits that were all that remained after a device had detonated. Fugo balloons were made of glue-laminated mulberry paper and filled with hydrogen. They were 33 feet in diameter and could carry up to 1,000 pounds of machinery, bombs, and ballast when launched.
Click or scan to see
this page online
42° 11.431′ N, 120° 20.687′ W. Marker is in Lakeview, Oregon, in Lake County. Marker is on North E Street just south of North 2nd Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lakeview OR 97630, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Favell-Utley Building (a few steps from this marker); Post & King Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Oregon Outback Scenic Byway (within shouting distance of this marker); Wilcox Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Heryford Building (about 400 feet away); Odd Fellows Bldg. (about 500 feet away); Lake County Veterans Memorial (about 500 feet away); Community Senior Center (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lakeview.
 
More about this marker. Marker is mounted on the front of the State of Oregon Department of Human Resources.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 21, 2020
3. Photo Displayed on Marker
When balloon bombs began arriving on American shores, the US government ordered news media to keep silent about the attack. The media complied. Although local warnings about the bombs were eventually issued, news of the weapons' arrival never reached Japan, where the program was abandoned due to the apparent lack of success.
Balloon Bomb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 21, 2020
4. Balloon Bomb Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 22, 2020, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 91 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 22, 2020, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=147073

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 19, 2021