Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Barbara in Santa Barbara County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Mission Historical Park

The City of Santa Barbara

 
 
Mission Historical Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, March 29, 2002
1. Mission Historical Park Marker
Inscription.  Santa Barbara Mission was founded December 4, 1786. Portions of five units of its extensive water works, built by Indian labor, are preserved in this park - a filter house, Spanish grist mill, sections of aqueducts, and two reservoirs. The larger reservoir, built in 1806, is used today as part of the city water system. Ruins of the pottery kiln and tanning vats are here. Also, the fountain and Lavadero are near by in front of the old Mission. A dam, built in 1807, is located in the Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens, one and one-half miles up Mission Canyon.
 
Erected 1957 by California State Park Commission. (Marker Number 309.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the California Historical Landmarks series list. A significant historical date for this entry is December 4, 1904.
 
Location. 34° 26.394′ N, 119° 42.732′ W. Marker is in Santa Barbara, California, in Santa Barbara County. Marker can be reached from East Los Olivos Street north of Alameda Padre
Marker and Mission Water Works image. Click for full size.
2017
2. Marker and Mission Water Works
Click or scan to see
this page online
Serra, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 502 East Los Olivos Street, Santa Barbara CA 93105, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Santa Barbara Mission Early Water Supply (here, next to this marker); Juana Maria (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Don Jose Francisco De Ortega (about 800 feet away); Moorish Fountain and Indian Community Laundry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Santa Barbara Mission Lavanderia (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Stagecoach Route (approx. 1.1 miles away); President Reagan Meets Queen Elizabeth II (approx. 1.2 miles away); First Ruling Sovereign of Europe to Visit America (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Barbara.
 
Marker and Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, March 26, 2020
3. Marker and Reservoir
The lower reservoir, built in 1806, is used today as part of the city water system.
Upper Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, March 26, 2020
4. Upper Reservoir
Filter image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, March 26, 2020
5. Filter
A pool inside allowed particles to settle to the bottom.
Mission Santa Barbara image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, March 24, 2002
6. Mission Santa Barbara
Lavadero image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, March 24, 2002
7. Lavadero
Part of the Mission building is seen in the background.
The Santa Barbara Mission Aqueduct image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, March 29, 2002
8. The Santa Barbara Mission Aqueduct
Built about 1806
by Indians under supervision of the padres


This marker placed by the Santa Barbara Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Colonists June 17 - 1935
The Santa Barbara Mission Aqueduct image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, March 29, 2002
9. The Santa Barbara Mission Aqueduct
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 16, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 710 times since then and 9 times this year. Last updated on April 11, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1. submitted on December 16, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   2. submitted on October 31, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   3, 4, 5. submitted on April 4, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on December 16, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.

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May. 9, 2021