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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carrollton in Dallas County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Korean Texans

 
 
Korean Texans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, April 19, 2020
1. Korean Texans Marker
Inscription.  

Korean immigrants first came to Texas in the early 20th century, with a handful living in the state by the 1920s. Most were laborers arriving from the western U.S., including Hawai'i, or from Mexico. However, larger numbers of Koreans immigrated following the Korean War (1950-53). The U.S. established military bases in Korea, and many U.S. servicemen met and married Korean women while stationed there, returning with their wives to Texas installations like Fort Hood (Bell Co.), Fort Bliss (El Paso Co.), and Fort Sam Houston (Bexar Co.). Additionally, a number of Korean orphans were adopted by Texas families following the war, particularly by Dallas residents.

An increasing number of Korean nurses and other professionals immigrated to the state after 1965, when the national origins quota system was abolished. Most of these professionals settled in urban areas, establishing growing communities in cities like Dallas and Houston. Others opened businesses in these cities and others throughout Texas. Korean business districts developed in Irving (Dallas Co.), Killeen (Hood Co.), and Houston's Spring Branch neighborhood (Harris Co.).

As
Korean Texans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, April 19, 2020
2. Korean Texans Marker
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Korean immigrants arrived in Texas, they often formed communities centering on Christian and Catholic churches. A number of ethnic Korean churches were established in Dallas, Houston, Killeen, and other cities with large Korean populations. The churches and other organizations helped arriving Koreans acclimate to life in the U.S. Today, the social, cultural, political, and commercial impact of Korean Texans continues to make a positive contribution to the state.
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16248.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Asian AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, Korean.
 
Location. 32° 59.147′ N, 96° 54.679′ W. Marker is in Carrollton, Texas, in Dallas County. Marker is on Old Denton Road, in the median. The marker is at the Shops of Old Denton in a roundabout. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2625 Old Denton Road, Carrollton TX 75007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Union Baptist Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); The Perry Cemetery (approx. 1.8 miles away); Alex W. and Sarah Perry Homestead (approx. 2.1 miles away); Carrollton Black Cemetery (approx. 2˝ miles away); a different marker also named Carrollton Black Cemetery
Korean Texans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, April 19, 2020
3. Korean Texans Marker
(approx. 2˝ miles away); St. John Baptist Church (approx. 2.6 miles away); Warner Cemetery (approx. 2.8 miles away); Texas International Pop Festival (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carrollton.
 
Korean Texans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, April 19, 2020
4. Korean Texans Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 20, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. This page has been viewed 147 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 20, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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