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Richmond in Cheshire County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Richmond Tramp House

Built 1914

 
 
Richmond Tramp House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2019
1. Richmond Tramp House Marker
Inscription.  This one room dwelling housed many “tramps” who passed through town during the first half of the 20th century. Severe economic conditions and high unemployment caused hundreds of thousands of people to take to the roads and railroads seeking work, handouts, food and shelter. Many towns built simple one room hostels where these vagrants were given a free meal and a bed before being urged to move on. The Richmond Tramp House, one of only a few remaining in the State of New Hampshire, serves as a mini museum recalling a significant era in Richmond's history and culture.

Restored in 2015 by the Richmond Heritage Commission

 
Erected 2015 by Richmond Heritage Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Charity & Public Work. A significant historical year for this entry is 1914.
 
Location. 42° 45.272′ N, 72° 16.434′ W. Marker is in Richmond, New Hampshire, in Cheshire County. Marker is on Winchester Road (New Hampshire Route 119) 0.1 miles west of Athol Road (New Hampshire Route 32), on the left
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when traveling west. Marker and Tramp House are located beside a pull-out and parking area on the south side of the road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Winchester NH 03470, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Winchester Memorial Church (approx. 5.7 miles away); Winchester Civil War Monument (approx. 5.7 miles away); Conant Library (approx. 5.7 miles away); Francis Parnell Murphy (approx. 5.7 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 5.7 miles away); Town of Winchester World War I Memorial (approx. 5.7 miles away); Over Two Centuries of Music Innovation (approx. 5.7 miles away); Leonard Wood (approx. 5.7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  In Richmond, a simple shelter channels nearly forgotten history. The years following the end of the American Civil War were still perilous times for a healing nation. Returning veterans found no work and no means of supporting themselves or their families. The ensuing Panics of 1873 and 1893, punctuated by railroad and bank failures and runs on bank deposits and gold reserves, made things worse. Depressed economic conditions persisted up until 1929, the start of the Great Depression when the bottom dropped out. The impact of all this was a growing migration of single and unemployed men from industrial cities, where jobs no longer existed,
Richmond Tramp House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2019
2. Richmond Tramp House
to more rural areas. Men took to the roads, and largely the railroads, in search of jobs, a free meal and a place to spend the night. These vagrants were called “tramps,” initially because they tramped from place to place. Some viewed tramp houses as a means of defense; others viewed this practice more charitably as caring for those who could not care for themselves. Either way, tramp houses were a significant part of the cultural fabric of as many as 40 towns in New Hampshire alone. (Submitted on June 29, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 29, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 1,220 times since then and 144 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 29, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 22, 2024