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Dover in Strafford County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Central (Lower) Square

 
 
Central (Lower) Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2019
1. Central (Lower) Square Marker
Inscription.  Central (Lower) Square, just after the turn of the 20th century, shows the bustling business activity at the intersection of Central Avenue and Washington Street. On the right is the Masonic Temple housing, among many other businesses, Frank J. Hanson’s gentlemen’s clothing store and Charles A. Faxon’s grocery. The Masonic Temple was to burn down on March 29, 1906. It would be rebuilt the following year.

Dover’s City Hall and Opera House sits on the site of our present-day city hall. It was Dover’s third municipal building and, like the first two, it burned down as well. The Opera House fire happened in 1933 and the building was replaced with our current Municipal Building in 1935. Just at the corner of Hale Street, is the Woodman Block, with its mansard roof, an outstanding example of Victorian-style commercial architecture. It was built in the late 1890s by Theodore Woodman who also donated the land now occupied by the Woodman Park School.

Next door was the Belknap Congregational Church, built in 1859 and closed in 1911. It was razed in the mid-1960s for a parking lot. Just up the street at the corner was J. Herbert Seavey’s
Marker detail: Belknap Congregational Church image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Belknap Congregational Church
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Hardware Store, a Dover institution for many decades.

Above is the printing office of Foster's Daily Democrat, founded by Joshua Lane Foster on June 18, 1873. Foster's moved to this location around 1900 and expanded many times since. Today, it is the only newspaper in the nation that carries a family name on its masthead and was the only daily paper in the U.S. that passed through five generations until its sale at the end of 2014. Its first issues were four pages and sold for 1.5 cents to just 150 readers.
 
Erected 2015 by Faces of Dover, and Dover Main Street, Inc. (Marker Number 6.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureChurches & ReligionIndustry & Commerce.
 
Location. 43° 11.708′ N, 70° 52.483′ W. Marker is in Dover, New Hampshire, in Strafford County. Marker is at the intersection of Central Avenue (New Hampshire Route 9) and Washington Street (New Hampshire Route 108), on the right when traveling south on Central Avenue. Marker is located along the sidewalk, at the northwest corner of the intersection. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 340 Central Avenue, Dover NH 03820, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Central Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Dover NH WWII Memorial (within shouting
Marker detail: Foster's Daily Democrat Printing Office image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Foster's Daily Democrat Printing Office
distance of this marker); Early 19th Century Storefronts (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dover NH WWI Memorial (about 400 feet away); Dover's Early Settlers (about 500 feet away); Dover NH Spanish American War Memorial/USS Maine Memorial (about 500 feet away); Dover's Black Day (about 500 feet away); Dover's City Hall and Opera House Burned (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dover.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. View Looking South on Central Ave, ca. 1900. (Submitted on July 2, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
2. Foster's Daily Democrat (Wikipedia). Foster's Daily Democrat is a six-day (Monday–Saturday) morning broadsheet newspaper published in Dover, New Hampshire, United States, covering southeast New Hampshire and southwest Maine. The paper was named after the U.S. Democratic Party, which [in 1873] was the conservative and less-popular party in New England. Foster was already known, as a political firebrand; one of his previous publishing ventures
Central (Lower) Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2019
4. Central (Lower) Square Marker
(looking south along Central Avenue • Foster's Daily Democrat building in background)
had been the States and Union, a pro-slavery paper in nearby Portsmouth, New Hampshire, during the American Civil War. Foster's Daily Democrat still takes a conservative line in its editorial pages, and tends to back Republicans. (Submitted on July 2, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Central (Lower) Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2019
5. Central (Lower) Square Marker
(looking southwest across Washington Street • Masonic Lodge building in background)
Foster's Daily Democrat building image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2019
6. Foster's Daily Democrat building
(across intersection from marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 5, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 2, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 68 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 2, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Sep. 22, 2021