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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Church Street Community

 
 
Church Street Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, August 2, 2020
1. Church Street Community Marker
Inscription.  Throughout much of the twentieth century, Church Street was the heart of a vibrant black community, filled with movement, color, and sound. Those who lived, worked, or visited there described it as "an experience."

The area was a bustling community of families and businesses. There were restaurants, grocery stores, doctors offices, funeral homes, cab stands, churches, clothing stores, beauty shops, and insurance companies. The Princess Theatre, movie house for the black community, Madison Connty Fairgrounds, and the American Legion Wilson Jones Post 351 were there. Local black newspapers, the Huntsville Gazette, the Huntsville Weekly Review, and the Huntsville Mirror, were also at one time on Church Street.

[Reverse]
The Church Street Community Center, housed in the Binford Miller Building, was an activity center for black youth. In 1951, the building also became the relocation site of the Dulcina DeBerry Library, Huntsville's first branch library for black residents.

On Church Street, the Second Cumberland Presbyterian and First Missionary Baptist churches served as gathering places
Church Street Community Marker (reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, August 2, 2020
2. Church Street Community Marker (reverse)
for civil rights activists during the 1960's. Two other houses of worship, St. John AME and Phillips Chapel CME, were also located on Church Street.

On Saturdays, blacks from throughout Madison County and surrounding communities came to Church Street for shopping, dining, visiting, and entertainment. With the advent of urban renewal and integration in the late 196O's, families and the once-thriving black business community along Church Street began migrating away from the area.

Sponsored by the Huntsville-Madison County Historical Society and the Huntsville-Madison County Bicentennial Committee
 
Erected 2019 by Alabama Historical Commission. Sponsored by the Huntsville-Madison County Historical Society and the Huntsville-Madison County Bicentennial Committee.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & ReligionIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 34° 43.893′ N, 86° 35.358′ W. Marker is in Huntsville, Alabama, in Madison County. Marker is at the intersection of Church Street Northwest and Holmes Avenue Northwest, on the right when traveling south on Church Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Holmes Ave NW, Huntsville AL 35801, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are
Church Street Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, August 2, 2020
3. Church Street Community Marker
within walking distance of this marker. Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery Boyhood Home Site (within shouting distance of this marker); The Chamber of Commerce Huntsville/Madison County (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Original Site of Lakeside United Methodist Church (about 700 feet away); Saint Mary's Church of the Visitation (about 700 feet away); Original Site of Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (approx. 0.2 miles away); Memorial Fountains (approx. 0.2 miles away); Where Does the Spring Water Go? (approx. 0.2 miles away); World War I (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 5, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 5, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 73 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 5, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
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