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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Texas State Capitol

 
 
Texas State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Pat Filippone, November 10, 2019
1. Texas State Capitol Marker
Inscription.  

Austin became the capital of Texas on January 19, 1840, and this hill was platted as Capitol Square. A limestone statehouse built here in the 1850's soon developed structural flaws. The Constitutional Convention of 1876 set aside 3,000,000 acres of public land to finance a new statehouse. Architect E. E Myers of Detroit won a national competition with his plans for this Capitol several months before the 1850's Capitol burned on November 9, 1881. The renaissance revival style building, three stories tall with a four story central block, features a dome at the crossing of its major axes.

Basement excavations began early in 1882. Railroads built especially for this project hauled limestone from the Oatmanville quarries in Travis County and Texas Sunset Red Granite donated by the owners of the Granite Mountain in Burnet County. Crews hoisted the Goddess of Liberty to the top of the dome in February 1888, making the Texas Capitol more than 14 feet taller than the U.S. Capitol. On May 18, 1888, State Senator Temple Houston, son of Texas hero Sam Houston, accepted the building on behalf of the people and called it "A structure that
Texas State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, August 15, 2017
2. Texas State Capitol Marker
shall stand as a sentinel of eternity."

The state legislature and other government function have met in the Capitol since its completion. In 1993, the four-story underground Capitol extension was completed to the North, more than doubling the square footage available to occupants and providing much needed space. A comprehensive interior and exterior renovation during the early 1990's returned the historic structure to its original grandeur while ensuring its functionality for future generations.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1965
Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 14150.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Government & Politics.
 
Location. 30° 16.376′ N, 97° 44.458′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is at the intersection of W 11th Street and Congress Avenue, on the right when traveling west on W 11th Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Austin TX 78701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Texas Legislatures (within shouting distance of this marker); Tyler Rose (within shouting distance of this marker); Southern Confederacy Monument (within shouting distance of this marker);
Texas State Capitol Marker Area image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 22, 2020
3. Texas State Capitol Marker Area
Governor James Edward Ferguson August 31, 1871 -September 21, 1944 (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Second Travis County Courthouse and Walton Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton (within shouting distance of this marker); The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas (within shouting distance of this marker); African Americans in the Texas Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 11, 2020, by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California. This page has been viewed 96 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 11, 2020, by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California.   2. submitted on March 4, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   3. submitted on December 22, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021