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Mansfield in Richland County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse

Scouting Heritage

 
 
Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2016
1. Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse Marker
Inscription.  Mansfield Boy Scout Troop 6 used this blockhouse as its meeting place for a period of fifty-one years from 1929 to 1980.

After a fire ravaged much of the lower portion of Mansfield's Blockhouse in 1938, it was the Boy Scouts that spearheaded its restoration. Three-hundred dollars were raised through donations by South Park's neighbors. This was the first time the interior of the lower crib was painted to hide the fire damage.

The fence to your left is a Locust split rail fence. This snake rail style is typical of many fences built in the early 1800s. A project done by Eagle Scout, Joseph Besecker, from Mansfield Troop 121, the fence was built in a similar fashion to the way it would have been built by settlers in this area. Locust trees were harvested locally and brought to the site where they were split using wedges and sledges as the settlers would have done. This fence was placed on foundation stones from the Mansfield Blockhouse's 1909 restoration.

The path and trail signs surrounding the blockhouse are a second Eagle Project done by a Boy Scout from Mansfield Troop 121, Noah Stampfli. The path, composed of #304 limestone,
Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse History image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2016
2. Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse History
(related marker on south side of blockhouse)
was made to be wheelchair accessible to ADA standards and the trail signs depict an accurate history of Mansfield's Blockhouse of 1812 as noted by blockhouse historian Lou Hart.

These projects would not have been possible without our donors: Leonard Dolce of Dolce's Tree Service • Dan Jacobs of Custom Blended Soils • Kokosing Construction Company • Mansfield Structural

Mansfield Blockhouse History
Although during the early 1800s, blockhouses much like this one were a common form of protection in case of Native American uprising, Mansfield's Blockhouse is the last standing with its original timbers. In 1812 eleven blockhouses were built throughout the Mansfield area.

This blockhouse, the last remaining of the eleven, was first located in Mansfield's Central Park. The Blockhouse of 1812 was built by Col. Charles Williams and company from Coshocton, Ohio with the help of local settlers.

Being temporary structures, the blockhouses, intended solely for use in the War of 1812, were demolished once they had outlived their purpose. Mansfield's Blockhouse of 1812, however, has a longer history. As the War of 1812 came to a close, Mansfield found itself in need of a courthouse and jail. Rather than building a new structure, the settlers decided to use the existing blockhouse that was then located at Central Park. In 1813, this blockhouse
Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse Timeline image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2016
3. Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse Timeline
(related marker on north side of blockhouse)
was renovated by Luther Coe. The lower crib of the blockhouse became Mansfield's first jail, while the upper crib became Mansfield's first courthouse.

It was used in this capacity for three years before being sold to James Curren. Now protected from the fate of demolition predestined for the other blockhouses, Mansfield's Blockhouse of 1812 lasted another ninety years before being reacquired by the City of Mansfield in 1906.

Mansfield Blockhouse Timeline
1812 — built in Central park for protection against Native American attack in the War of 1812
1813 — renovated for $48 by Luther Coe to house Mansfield’s first courthouse and jail
1816 — sold at auction to James Curren for $56.40 and moved to lot 168 Virgin Alley off of 2nd Street
1906 — bought by the City of Mansfield for $225 to be reconstructed for Mansfield’s Centennial in 1908 and rebuilt on South Courthouse lawn
1909 — (February 19) sledded in two parts to South Park after an ice storm and used as storage for the City of Mansfield for 20 years
1938 — much of the lower crib interior was burnt by a fire and was then restored by the Boy Scouts who raised $300 in donations for the restoration
1963 — stabilization began with replacement of several of the lower crib’s rotting logs and
Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2016
4. Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse Marker
rebuilding of the foundation
1979 — the foundation was stabilized for a second time
1983 — major repairs were made and remodeling was done for Mansfield’s 175th Anniversary
2007 — total restoration was completed for Mansfield’s Bicentennial; the structure was dismantled, assessed, historically restored and moved 80 feet East to its current location and 5th home
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsSettlements & SettlersWar of 1812.
 
Location. 40° 45.372′ N, 82° 32.486′ W. Marker is in Mansfield, Ohio, in Richland County. Marker can be reached from Brinkerhoff Avenue 0.2 miles south of Park Avenue West (State Route 430), on the right when traveling south. Marker is located on the east side of the blockhouse, in Mansfield's South Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Brinkerhoff Avenue, Mansfield OH 44906, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mansfield Blockhouse (a few steps from this marker); Civil War Cannons (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sultana Disaster (within shouting distance of this marker); John Chapman (within shouting distance of this marker); 120th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Memorial
Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse (<i>north elevation</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2016
5. Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse (north elevation)
(timeline marker visible in foreground)
(about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); "Johnny Appleseed" Monument (about 600 feet away); Mansfield Block House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sultana Tragedy (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mansfield.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Mansfield War of 1812 Blockhouse
 
Also see . . .
1. The Blockhouse in South Park: Icon of Mansfield, Ohio. The Blockhouse in South Park has been a prominent feature of Mansfield for over 200 years. It is possible that the Blockhouse is the oldest remaining courthouse and jail in the entire state of Ohio. (Submitted on August 20, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Blockhouse as an Icon of Mansfield. This photo essay explores different images of the Blockhouse, and various ways in which the image has been put to use in defining our civic identity. (Submitted on August 20, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse (<i>east elevation</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2016
6. Mansfield's War of 1812 Blockhouse (east elevation)
(view from near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 17, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 70 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 20, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Mar. 6, 2021