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Near Flat Rock in Jackson County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Flat Rock High School

1911 - 1929

 
 
Flat Rock High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 12, 2020
1. Flat Rock High School Marker
Inscription.  In 1905. the Methodist Episcopal Church. South. authorized Dr. Frank Gardner and his wife, Annie, to begin Flat Rock School In 1911, Flat Rock High School formally opened. It was the only high school on Sand Mountain north of Albertville. The North Alabama Methodist Conference approved Dr. Gardner as the school superintendent and Robert H Hartford to be the first principal. The school's first graduation was held in 1912.

In 1914 construction began on a two-story administrative building made of stone quarried from the property of Andrew Hogue. Completed at a cost of $12.000. the new building featured four recitation halls. a library, an office, and a large auditorium with opera-style seating. The auditorium hosted church services and school programs beginning in 1917.

Back side:
Flat Rock High School offered a classical curriculum which included instruction in foreign languages, as well as a diverse agricultural course of study. At its height, the 292-acre school campus included two dormitories, a library, vocational building, grist mill, and a sawmill. A church historian called the school “one of Methodism's
Flat Rock High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 12, 2020
2. Flat Rock High School Marker
best.”

Other principals of the school were N. Homer Price (1913), Isaac Carlton (1915), Leon G. Alverson (1918-1921, 1926-1927), George W. Floyd (1921-1925), and William Marvin McDonald (1925- 1926). The last superintendent was Dr. Samuel L. Dobbs (1928-1929).

In the mid-1920s, the boys' dormitory burned. A few years later, in 1929, the girls' dormitory burned as well. After these setbacks, and diminished funding with the onset of the Great Depression, the school's board of trustees reluctantly closed the school in 1929 and sold it to the State of Alabama. The Jackson County Board of Education later reopened it as a junior high school serving nine grades.

Erected during the bicentennial of Jackson County and the State of Alabama.
 
Erected 2019 by Jackson County Historical Association; Flat Rock Community Club; local citizens; Alabama Historical Association.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Education.
 
Location. 34° 46.177′ N, 85° 41.672′ W. Marker is near Flat Rock, Alabama, in Jackson County. Marker is at the intersection of County Road 326 and County Road 99, on the right when traveling east on County Road 326. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 788 County Road 326, Flat Rock AL 35966, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles
Flat Rock High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 12, 2020
3. Flat Rock High School Marker
of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Road to Chickamauga (approx. 8.1 miles away); Crow Town (approx. 9.3 miles away); Wet, Wild, and Wonderful (approx. 9.7 miles away); Averyville (approx. 10.4 miles away); Fort Harker (approx. 10.4 miles away); Flight 800 Memorial (approx. 10.6 miles away); Stevenson Depot and Hotel (approx. 10.7 miles away); Union Army Headquarters (approx. 10.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  History of Flat Rock School. From school district website. (Submitted on September 14, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
Flat Rock High School Marker image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Alabama Department of Archives & History, circa 1935
4. Flat Rock High School Marker
The old Flat Rock High School in Jackson County, Alabama, owned by the Methodist Episcopal Church. By the time this photograph was taken (circa 1930s), the building was only used for church activities.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 14, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 14, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
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Oct. 25, 2020