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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Palm Beach in Palm Beach County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Flagler Memorial Bridge

Original year of construction 1938

 

— Replacement completed 2017 —

 
Flagler Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jay Kravetz, October 3, 2020
1. Flagler Memorial Bridge Marker
Inscription.  During the late 1800s, Henry Morrison Flagler built numerous resort hotels and a railroad network, the Florida East Coast Railway, along the east coast of Florida. In 1894, Flagler constructed the Royal Poinciana Hotel in Palm Beach, which became the world's largest wooden resort hotel and could accommodate 1,200 guests. Initially guests traveled across Lake Worth to the hotel by boat since there was no bridge connecting the mainland to the Island of Palm Beach.

Flagler constructed a railroad bridge in 1895 to offer guests direct access to his hotel. This would be the first bridge linking Palm Beach with the mainland. The first bridge terminated just south of the Royal Poinciana Hotel and just north of Whitehall, Flagler’s winter home. Flagler had the railway bridge reconstructed further north of Whitehall because his wife disliked the noise so close to their home. The replacement railroad bridge was completed in 1902.

In 1938, and automobile bridge partially funded by the Public Works Administration (funded under Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal Program) replaced the 1902 railroad bridge. The bridge, named Flagler Memorial
Flagler Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jay Kravetz, October 3, 2020
2. Flagler Memorial Bridge Marker
Bridge, honors Henry Flagler’s contributions to the development of the East Coaso of Florida. Colonel Edward R. Bradley, considered a prominent figure in the development of Palm Beach, donated gateway pylons with wrought iron lanterns to enhance the appearance of the Palm Beach side of the bridge.

Completed in 1938, the bridge was a double-leaf rolling lift bascule bridge. The total length of the bridge was 2,299 feet over the Lake Worth lagoon. At the time the Flagler Memorial Bridge was the the largest bascule bridge in Florida. In 2007, Flagler Memorial Bridge was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected 2017 by FDOT, the Town of Palm Beach and the City of West Palm Beach.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Bridges & ViaductsCharity & Public WorkPatriots & PatriotismRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 26° 43.09′ N, 80° 2.778′ W. Marker is in Palm Beach, Florida, in Palm Beach County. Marker is on Royal Poinciana Way (Florida Route A1A) 0.3 miles west of Bradley Place, on the right when traveling west. The marker appears on both sides of the bridge just east of the draw. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Palm Beach FL 33480, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this
Flagler Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jay Kravetz, October 3, 2020
3. Flagler Memorial Bridge Marker
marker. West Palm Beach Fishing Club (approx. ¼ mile away); Dade County State Bank Building (approx. 0.3 miles away); Royal Poinciana Hotel (approx. 0.3 miles away); Henry Morrison Flagler (approx. 0.3 miles away); Flagler Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); Old St. Ann's Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Sea Gull Cottage (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Royal Poinciana Chapel (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Palm Beach.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 6, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 4, 2020, by Jay Kravetz of West Palm Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 50 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 4, 2020, by Jay Kravetz of West Palm Beach, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021