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Belle Meade in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Belle Meade Railway Station

 
 
The Belle Meade Railway Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Darren Jefferson Clay, March 21, 2020
1. The Belle Meade Railway Station Marker
Inscription.  
In 1872 the Belle Meade railroad station was an active part of General Harding's Thoroughbred industry. The Railroad line running through the Belle Meade farm had numerous names and owners. In 1867, the State of Tennessee took over the line which had been unable to repay a sizeable loan made by the state. The State leased the N&NWRR line to the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad in 1870, for a term of 6 years. Through a series of numerous sales and name changes by 1873 the line was officially named the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad. The line had stations in Belle Meade, Bellevue, flag stations at Vaughn's Gap and Pegram, and a watering place at Newsome's Tank, 17 miles from Nashville and 153 miles from Hickman, Ky. General Harding and his Head Groom, Bob Green, ensured that newly born colts were trained to walk the ramps and load into train cars to be ready to ship north for sale. In May of 1878, General Harding also shipped 200 deer fawns by train to the Blooming Grove, Pennsylvania, Hunting & Fishing Club.

[Captions:]
About 150 people came out on the train to attend General Harding's
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1876 Yearling Sale. Many buyers had come to see and bid on the get of Bonnie Scotland and Harding's new sire John Morgan. Visitors were accustomed to traveling from West Side Park in downtown Nashville to the Belle Meade station for horse sales.

In anticipation of the 1878 yearling sale, General Harding constructed a new sale barn 112 feet long and 75 feet wide. Located in a wooded lot across Richland Creek to the West of the main house, the barn enclosed an open court 66 feet square used as the display ring for showing horses.

The Jackson family frequently traveled by train for leisure. General Jackson made numerous trips to New York City by train. The family also received prominent visitors at Belle Meade, such as President Grover Cleveland in 1887.

As visitors arrived by train, they were met at the depot by waiting carriages and drivers to be escorted up the main drive to the Belle Meade house. View of Belle Meade house from Harding Pike near the train station.

 
Erected by Belle Meade Plantation.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsIndustry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #22 and #24 Grover Cleveland series list.
 
Location.
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36° 6.455′ N, 86° 52.012′ W. Marker is in Belle Meade, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker is on Harding Pike (U.S. 70S) 0.2 miles north of Leake Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5053 Harding Pike, Nashville TN 37205, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Natchez Trace (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); War on the Home Front (approx. 0.2 miles away); Belle Meade Plantation (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Belle Meade Plantation (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dairy (approx. 0.2 miles away); Slave Cabin (approx. 0.2 miles away); In 1807 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Belle Meade Bourbon (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 26, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 26, 2020, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. This page has been viewed 65 times since then and 18 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on October 26, 2020, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 8, 2021