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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch

 
 
Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 21, 2020
1. Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch Marker
Inscription.  

The Marks LH7 Ranch was established by E.H. and Maud Marks in 1907 near Addicks, three miles from here. In 1917, they moved the ranch to this 640 acre site. The LH7 Ranch grew to become one of the largest ranches in Southeast Texas.

The LH7 Ranch was known for breeding longhorn cattle with Brahman bulls from India. They also were instrumental in creating one of America's largest and most authentic herds of pure longhorn cattle. The Marks Family was one of the seven families credited with saving the longhorn from extinction.

Rodeos were held here for 30 years. In 1952, E. H. Marks founded and rode in the first Saltgrass Trail Ride, which is reenacted every year to kick off the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo.

E. H. Marks died in 1969 and this portion of the property passed to his daughter Maudeen. After Maudeen's death, the family created this sign and site to commemorate the LH7 Ranch and its importance in Texas' ranching history.

Captions
The Marks LH7 Ranch Headquarters main house was located approximately 400 feet south of what is now the intersection of Kingsland Road and Barker-Cypress.

The
Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 21, 2020
2. Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch Marker
main entrance gate was made of concrete in the faux bois (false wood) style popularized by San Antonio artist Dionicio Rodriguez in the 1930s.

The main house served as the Ranch Headquarters. It was built by Judd Simpson, husband of E. H. Marks' sister Sophie Marks Simpson, in 1917-18.

This photo of E. H. Marks was taken in front of his log cabin, where he gathered with friends to smoke cigars and play cards.

This hay barn, known as The Big Red Barn (not shown above), was the largest building on the Ranch.

E. H. Marks shows off a longhorn whose horns measure 49.5 inches from tip to tip. They are standing in front of the slaughterhouse.
 
Erected by The Marks Family.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsIndustry & Commerce.
 
Location. 29° 46.567′ N, 95° 41.147′ W. Marker is near Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is on Barker - Clodine 0.3 miles south of Cypress - Chase, on the right when traveling south. The marker is located at a small historical park with a parking lot for a few cars. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Houston TX 77094, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. LH7 Ranch (here, next to this marker); Barker Post Office (approx. 1.1 miles away); Gray Lodge No. 329, A.F.& A.M.
Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 21, 2020
3. Former Site of the Marks LH7 Ranch Marker
(approx. 3˝ miles away); Bear Creek Methodist Church and Cemetery (approx. 3.6 miles away); Moore Log House (approx. 7 miles away); Alief Cemetery (approx. 7 miles away); Dairy (Alief) (approx. 7.1 miles away); First Baptist Church of Katy (approx. 8.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Also see . . .
1. LH7 Ranch. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on November 2, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. History of the Salt Grass Trail Ride. The Library of Congress (Submitted on November 2, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

3. Texas Longhorn. Wikipedia (Submitted on November 2, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Windmill and water tank from the Marks LH7 Ranch image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 21, 2020
4. Windmill and water tank from the Marks LH7 Ranch
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 3, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 2, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 43 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 2, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 2, 2021