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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Lufkin in Angelina County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Vicente Micheli

 
 
Vicente Micheli Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 6, 2020
1. Vicente Micheli Marker
Inscription.  

Italian-born Vicente Micheli (c.1755-1848) came to North America around 1770 via New Orleans and moved to the Spanish Territory of Texas by 1793. He settled first in Nacogdoches and later received a grant of land near this site. His grant was the first patented by the Spanish Crown in what became Angelina County. In an unusual business deal, he acquired more than 24,000 acres from a member of the Bidais tribe in exchange for several items, including a blue petticoat, a white shirt, eight brass bracelets, a handful of vermillion and а "fathom" of red ribbon.

Between 1798 and 1812, Micheli worked as a merchant for Barr & Davenport, a trading firm authorized by the Spanish Crown, doing business with Native Americans. Prior to 1806, he moved to Bexár, present-day San Antonio, while continuing his business dealings in Nacogdoches. Micheli complied with orders in 1806 to move to Santísima Trinidad de Salcedo, a newly-established Spanish settlement on the Trinity river. Six years later, he fled to Louisiana because of the Magee-Gutiérrez insurrection, a failed rebellion against Spanish rule in Mexico. Receiving a royal pardon,
The Vicente Micheli Marker, on the right image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 6, 2020
2. The Vicente Micheli Marker, on the right
Micheli was one of only two individuals who returned to Texas.

In 1815, Micheli purchased additional land in the La Villita District of San Antonio. He continued to work as a businessman, referring to himself as "The Merchant of Venice". In his later years, he was an astute speculator, Indian trader and merchant with landholdings in at least nine modern-day Texas counties. Dying in San Antonio at the age of ninety-three, Micheli left a profound legacy of pioneer business development prior to the Texas Revolution of the 1830s.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2017 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18725.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 31° 26.862′ N, 94° 43.563′ W. Marker is near Lufkin, Texas, in Angelina County. Marker is on U.S. 59 0.4 miles north of Bates Road (County Highway 118-B), on the right when traveling north. The marker is located at a small pullout along Highway 59. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lufkin TX 75901, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Don Joaquin/Procella Crossing (here, next to this marker); Redland Baptist Church (approx. 2.7 miles away); Walker Cemetery
A view of the road with the two markers at the pullout. image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 6, 2020
3. A view of the road with the two markers at the pullout.
(approx. 3.6 miles away); Gann Memorial Cemetery (approx. 5.1 miles away); Central Consolidated School (approx. 5.2 miles away); Angelina & Neches River Railroad (approx. 5½ miles away); Berry Cemetery (approx. 5.7 miles away); German POWs in the East Texas Timber Industry (approx. 6½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lufkin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Magee-Gutiérrez Expedition. Wikipedia (Submitted on November 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Micheli, Texas. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on November 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021