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Rush in Marion County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Mining Turkey Fat and Rosin Jack

Buffalo National River

 

— National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
Mining Turkey Fat and Rosin Jack Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 6, 2019
1. Mining Turkey Fat and Rosin Jack Marker
Inscription.  
My daddy…was almost killed…in the mines. It caved in and they heard gravel and felt it hitting their hats. They started running, well it did kill one man. It caught him. He almost got out, but he didn't. But the rest of them got out.
Nadine Goodall, Rush resident

About a tenth of a mile up the Rush Mountain Trail are the openings-now gated and locked- to the workings of the Morning Star Mine. During the early 1890s zinc mining was simple. Rich ore (smithsonite), containing up to 52 percent zinc, was easy to find. With pick and shovel, miners dug the lemon-yellow mineral they called turkey fat.

By the late 1890s the richer ores became scarcer, and miners had to dig deeper into the hillside. There, miners found amber-colored rosin jack (sphalerite zinc mineral) in stratified beds, pockets, and fissures. By 1916 extracting the ore required more sophisticated tools and methods, like compressed-air drills and jackhammers, blasting with dynamite, and milling with state-of-the-art concentration tables. With the need to mine deeper came increased dangers for the miners,
Mining Turkey Fat and Rosin Jack Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 6, 2019
2. Mining Turkey Fat and Rosin Jack Marker
and some miners died digging the ore.

[Sidebar:]
What's Here Now
Today the unstable mines are gated to keep people out and allow bats in. The old mines have become important nurseries and hibernating places for bats. Bats are very vulnerable to disturbance. Protect the bats and yourself by staying out of the mines.

Indiana bats roost in the abandoned mines.

 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce.
 
Location. 36° 7.917′ N, 92° 34.15′ W. Marker is in Rush, Arkansas, in Marion County. Marker is on County Road 6035 0.3 miles east of County Road 637, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rush, Arkansas 57174, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 200 Tons A Day (within shouting distance of this marker); Company Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Company Store and Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Break It, Remake It (within shouting distance of this marker); Town Hub (within shouting distance of this marker); Four-footed Link (within
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shouting distance of this marker); Silver-lined Dreams (within shouting distance of this marker); Change and Renewal (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rush.
 
Also see . . .  Rush (Ghost Town). (Submitted on December 6, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 6, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 6, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021