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Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Hendrick Arnold and Samuel McCulloch, Jr.

 
 
Hendrick Arnold and Samuel McCulloch, Jr. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 16, 2020
1. Hendrick Arnold and Samuel McCulloch, Jr. Marker
Inscription.  

Hendrick Arnold and Samuel McCulloch, Jr. played important roles in the Texas Revolution and the formation of the Republic of Texas. After Texas became independent, both were considered free Blacks, but they were placed under severe legal restrictions. Samuel McCulloch, Jr., who lived near the Lavaca River with his family, has been called "a genuine Texas hero.” McCulloch volunteered to serve in the Texas Army and was wounded at the Battle of Goliad, the only Texan to be injured. After the war in 1837, he petitioned the Republic of Texas for citizenship rights and land. His petition was rejected, but McCulloch performed other military duties for the Republic of Texas, including serving as a spy during the Mexican invasion of San Antonio in 1842. After twenty years of petitioning the Congress of the Republic of Texas and the Texas State Legislature, McCulloch finally received his land in 1858 and settled at Von Ormy in Bexar County, where he farmed and ranched until his death in 1893.

Hendrick Arnold's family resided in San Antonio. In 1835, Arnold and his father-in-law, Erastus Smith, went on a hunting trip. When they
Texas African American History Memorial (back) image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 16, 2020
2. Texas African American History Memorial (back)
attempted to go home, Mexican soldiers, who had since occupied San Antonio, refused to let them return. Subsequently, both Arnold and his father-in-law joined the Texas Army under Stephen F. Austin and worked as soldiers, spies and guides. Arnold became known in military circles as an associate of Sam Houston, an efficient and brave spy, and was cited for his service in the Texas Revolution. With his commendation from the Republic of Texas, he acquired land outside of San Antonio where he is buried today.
 
Erected 2016 by the Texas African American History Memorial Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansWar, Texas Independence.
 
Location. 30° 16.399′ N, 97° 44.489′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is at the intersection of West 11th Street and Congress Avenue, on the right when traveling west on West 11th Street. Marker is on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1100 Congress Avenue, Austin TX 78701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The 21st Century (here, next to this marker); Battles for Texas Independence from Mexico (here, next to this marker); Civil War, Emancipation and Juneteenth (here, next to this marker);
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Post Reconstruction Challenges and Achievements (here, next to this marker); Slavery During the Mexican National Era (here, next to this marker); Reconstruction and the Post Slavery Experience (here, next to this marker); Slavery During the Republic and Early Statehood (here, next to this marker); Major Achievements (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
More about this marker. The marker is one of ten markers on the Texas African American History Memorial. The monument honors the many contributions of African Americans in Texas. The markers trace the history of African Americans from the 1500s to the present.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 4, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 21, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas. This page has been viewed 59 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 21, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas.
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Feb. 24, 2021