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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Helotes in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

John T. Floore Country Store

 
 
John T. Floore Country Store Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 16, 2020
1. John T. Floore Country Store Marker
Inscription.  

In 1945, as the Second World War drew to a close, John T. Floore, manager of San Antonio's Majestic Theatre, purchased land in this vicinity. He created the Floore Subdivision, planning it as a center for the community of Helotes, which had developed at the site of a centuries-old stream crossing for travelers. Floore and his wife originally operated a Red and White Store. Following the example of Bert Hileman, who owned an early dance hall in Helotes, Floore built a store and dance hall at this site circa 1946, offering "bar, café, dance, meats, groceries, real estate and every thing nearly at Floore Country Store." A noted promoter, Floore featured country music acts big and small; notables included Bob Wills, Patsy Cline, Hank Williams, Kitty Wells and Elvis Presley. Residents came from nearby communities for the regular shows.

Floore also promoted the Helotes community, helping establish the local volunteer fire department and Lions Club. In addition, he edited the Helotes Echo newspaper, and his articles were said to be instrumental in the creation of the Northside Independent School District for Helotes-area students. His
Floore Country Store Marker at its entrance image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 16, 2020
2. Floore Country Store Marker at its entrance
business establishment served as a gathering place for several organizations and events, including the annual Helotes Cornyval Festival.

Since Floore's death in 1975, his legacy has continued. Helotes incorporated in 1981 in order to preserve a separate identity from the ever-growing city of San Antonio. With the continuation of musical acts at Floore's County Store, and through the local organizations that grew out of Floore's ideas and civic efforts, the community of Helotes maintains a link to its early years as a stop for refreshment and entertainment at the edge of the Texas Hill Country.
 
Erected 2005 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13262.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EntertainmentIndustry & Commerce.
 
Location. 29° 34.669′ N, 98° 41.435′ W. Marker is in Helotes, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is at the intersection of Old Bandera Road and Floore Road, on the right when traveling north on Old Bandera Road. The marker is located directly in front of the Floore Country Store. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14492 Old Bandera Rd, Helotes TX 78023, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Helotes (within shouting distance of this marker); Gugger Homestead (within shouting distance
The view of the John T. Floore Country Store and marker from the street. image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 16, 2020
3. The view of the John T. Floore Country Store and marker from the street.
of this marker); Marnoch Homestead (approx. 0.6 miles away); Scenic Loop Playground (approx. 2.6 miles away); Zion Lutheran Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Zion Lutheran Church and Cemetery (approx. 3 miles away); R.L. White Ranch (approx. 4.4 miles away); First Officers Training Camp (approx. 7.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Helotes.
 
Also see . . .  Helotes Texas. The Spanish terms elotes and olotes, Americanized to Helotes, which means corn on the cob, has been used for the area since the early 1700s, when it was mentioned in a Spanish report to the governor of the region, describing the area where Apaches scalped a Spaniard who had been looking for stray horses. How the name was derived is unknown; however, it is believed that Lipans had cultivated corn along the creek for centuries before frequent raids of Comanche Indians made such agricultural activities impossible. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 22, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 23, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 22, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 22, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 5, 2021