Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Forsyth in Rosebud County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

First Presbyterian Church and Manse

 
 
First Presbyterian Church and Manse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2020
1. First Presbyterian Church and Manse Marker
Inscription.  When an overheated furnace set fire to the First Presbyterian Church in December 1919, the congregation lost everything but the Prairie style manse built next door in 1910. While church members temporarily held services in the Masonic Hall, news of the fire and pleas for help rebuilding spread through the national Presbyterian press. Among those who responded was an unnamed benefactress from Illinois, a member of Chicago’s distinguished Fourth Presbyterian Church. Because she admired her own church building, the benefactress hired Howard Van Doren Shaw, a Chicago architect associated with Fourth Presbyterian, to design a new church for Forsyth. Shaw’s design, as adapted by Montana architects McIver and Cohagen, echoed on a much smaller scale the basic lines of the prestigious Chicago church. The result: this beautiful single-story yellow brick building with a tall gabled clerestory flanked by three small cross gables. Its simplified Gothic style details include buttressed walls and a prominent pointed-arch entranceway. Although church trustees originally estimated reconstruction would cost $30,000 to $35,000, Shaw’s design was more ambitious
First Presbyterian Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2020
2. First Presbyterian Church and Marker
The marker is to the right of the stairs.
than they expected, and more than the small congregation, hit hard by the declining homesteading economy, could afford—even with substantial national support. Compromises were made; for example, many of the church’s rectangular windows lie beneath window arches originally intended to frame dramatic stained glass, and some of the interior detailing remained uncompleted until the 1970s. In 1950, Forsyth’s Presbyterians and Methodists joined together to form the Federated Church; the united congregation continues to meet in this downtown landmark.
 
Erected by Montana Historical Society.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Churches & Religion. In addition, it is included in the Montana National Register Sign Program series list.
 
Location. 46° 16.06′ N, 106° 40.589′ W. Marker is in Forsyth, Montana, in Rosebud County. Marker is at the intersection of Cedar Street and North 12th Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Cedar Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1106-1108 Cedar Street, Forsyth MT 59327, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wilson Residence (within shouting distance of this marker); 241 North Eleventh Avenue (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Blue Front Rooming House
First Presbyterian Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2020
3. First Presbyterian Church and Marker
The marker is to the right of the stairs.
(about 300 feet away); Forsyth, MT (about 300 feet away); Rosebud County Courthouse (about 400 feet away); Northway Residence (about 400 feet away); E.A. Richardson Residence (about 500 feet away); McCuistion Residence (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Forsyth.
 
First Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2020
4. First Presbyterian Church
First Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Google maps screen shot, January 18, 2021
5. First Presbyterian Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 18, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 18, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 1, 2021