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Nashville in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Coach Ed Temple

 
 
Coach Ed Temple Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, January 23, 2021
1. Coach Ed Temple Marker
Inscription.  Coach Ed Temple is a Nashville and American legend, the embodiment of perseverance, determination and success.

As women's track coach at Tennessee State University from 1953 to 1994 and coach of the U.S. women's Olympic track team in 1960, 1964 and 1980, Coach Temple ranks among the most impressive leaders in the history of sports both nationally and internationally.

As important as his contributions on the track are the marks he's made off it. Coach Temple is just as proud that every single one of his 40 Olympians earned her diploma as he is of his 23 Olympic medalists. The success his program achieved as a historically black college operating in the Deep South during the days of Jim Crow is as much a testament to his strength and determination, and that of his Tigerbelles, as any records they set on the track.

Their records included 37 national championships. Coach Temple was elected to the Tennessee and Pennsylvania Sports Halls of Fame, and the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame (one of only three coaches so honored) and received the Inaugural Legends Award by the U.S. Track and Field Association in 2014.

Coach Ed Temple Statue image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, January 23, 2021
2. Coach Ed Temple Statue
★ ★

Edward Stanley Temple was born September 20, 1927 in Harrisburg, PA. He graduated from John Harris High School where he was All-State in track and football. He received his B.S. degree from Tennessee State University in 1950 and M.S. degree in 1953. He married fellow TSU graduate Charlie B. Law in 1950, who served as TSU's Director of Postal Services for 42 years. Mr. and Mrs. Temple have a daughter, Dr. Edwina R. Temple and son Lloyd Bernard Temple. Mrs. Temple passed away in 2008.

Brian P. Hanlon, Sculptor
2015

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansEducationSports.
 
Location. 36° 10.266′ N, 86° 47.099′ W. Marker is in Nashville, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker is on Rep. John L. Lewis Way (FKA 5th Avenue North) north of Harrison Street, on the right when traveling north. Marker is next to a parking garage at First Horizon Park, home of the Nashville Sounds minor-league baseball team. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nashville TN 37219, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Baseball in Civil War Nashville (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hell’s Half Acre (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Original Gas Works (approx. ¼ mile away); Two Governors, Two Governments
U.S. Women's Track and Field Coach Ed Temple during the 1960 Olympics in Rome. image. Click for full size.
By Public domain, 1960
3. U.S. Women's Track and Field Coach Ed Temple during the 1960 Olympics in Rome.
(approx. ¼ mile away); Germantown Historic District (approx. 0.3 miles away); Tomb of James Knox Polk (approx. 0.3 miles away); Holy Rosary Cathedral (approx. 0.3 miles away); Germantown Brewery District (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nashville.
 
Also see . . .  Remembering the Life and Legacy of Coach Edward S. Temple. Videos, news, historic photos and more about Temple, who died in 2016 in Nashville. From Tennessee State University. (Submitted on January 24, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 24, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 24, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 24, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
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Mar. 7, 2021