Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Kincheonville

 
 
Kincheonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By David White, February 28, 2016
1. Kincheonville Marker
Inscription.  

Thomas Kincheon, a former slave from Mississippi, established the rural community of Kincheonville in this area shortly after emancipation in 1865. Many independent communities were created in Texas by African Americans following the Civil War, usually on undesirable or unprofitable land. Although these places were often poor, the freedmen were able to live their lives and practice their religion without outside interference. Unlike other freedmen’s communities in Texas, tradition holds that Anglos and Hispanics lived alongside African Americans in Kincheonville. Kincheon and his wife, Mary, operated a farm that supplied milk and butter to Austin’s all-Black Tillotson college. Several members of the Kincheon family are buried at the Williamson Creek Cemetery four miles east of this site. Public life in Kincheonville was centered on Zion Rest Baptist Church, established in 1903 as both a congregation and a school. Kincheonville remained a small farming community until 1928, when the city passed a new master plan designed to force African Americans out of their homes.

Public utilities like schools and water lines were only open
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
to African Americans in a “Negro District” on the far side of East Avenue (now IH-35). This policy, combined with the economic shocks of the Great Depression, pushed many residents out of Kincheonville and other historically Black neighborhoods. In 1952, Thomas Kincheon II sold the land for suburban development. Although the Kincheon family moved to east Austin in the 1960s, Blumie, Elijah, James Andrew and Minnie Streets still bear their names. Zion Rest continues to serve the area from a sanctuary built in 1965.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18237.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 30° 12.447′ N, 97° 49.763′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is on Paisano Trail east of Brodie Lane, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3326 Paisano Trail, Austin TX 78745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Rock Store (approx. 2.6 miles away); Oak Hill (approx. 3 miles away); Cementerio Mexicano de Maria de la Luz (approx. 3.3 miles away); Boggy Creek Masonic Cemetery (approx. 3.4 miles
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
away); Onion Creek Lodge 220, A.F. & A.M. (approx. 3.6 miles away); The Original Skyline Club Sign (approx. 3.6 miles away); Fort Magruder, C.S.A (approx. 4.2 miles away); Education in Manchaca (approx. 4.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kincheonville, TX on Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on February 14, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
2. Thomas Kincheon, photo and post from Austin History Center. (Submitted on February 14, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 14, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photo   1. submitted on February 14, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 5, 2021