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Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Major General John Armstrong (1717-1795)

First Citizen of Carlisle

 
 
Major General John Armstrong (1717-1795) wayside image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, January 1, 2004
1. Major General John Armstrong (1717-1795) wayside
Inscription.  
This stone marks the grave of Major General John Armstrong, “First Citizen of Carlisle” and “Hero of Kittanning”.

Armstrong was born October 13, 1717 in Ireland and settled in the Cumberland Valley sometime between 1745-1748. As a surveyor for the William Penn family, he and William Lyon laid out the town of Carlisle in 1750. He also assisted in surveying the road from Alexandria, Virginia to Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburgh) which was used by British General Edward Braddock before his defeat at the Battle of the Monongahela in 1755.

On September 8, 1756, as a lieutenant colonel in the Pennsylvania militia, Armstrong led 300 soldiers from the Cumberland Valley in a successful attack of the Delaware Indian village of Kittanning in Western Pennsylvania, following repeated French-inspired attacks on colonial settlements. As a colonel, he commanded Pennsylvania militia during the successful 1758 Forbes Expedition to capture French held Fort Duquesne and was given the honor of raising the British flag over the captured fort. Later, as a major general in command of Pennsylvania militia during the Revolutionary
Major General John Armstrong gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 11, 2011
2. Major General John Armstrong gravesite
war, he fought at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown. During their service together in the French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars, General Armstrong developed a lifelong friendship with General George Washington.

In his long career of public service, Armstrong also served as an assemblyman for York and Cumberland Counties, as a Cumberland County judge, was President of the Dickenson College Board of Trustees for nine years, and was twice elected as a member of the Continental Congress.

Armstrong died at age 77 on March 9, 1795 in Carlisle. Armstrong Hall at Carlisle Barracks and Armstrong County in Pennsylvania are named in his honor.

A Project of Historic Carlisle, Inc.
 
Erected by Historic Carlisle, Inc.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary.
 
Location. 40° 11.878′ N, 77° 11.251′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker can be reached from East South Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: The Old Graveyard, Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Graveyard (within shouting distance of this marker); Brigadier General William Thompson (within shouting distance of this marker); Molly Pitcher
Major General John Armstrong image. Click for full size.
By Find A Grave, unknown
3. Major General John Armstrong
(within shouting distance of this marker); Carlisle Old Graveyard Revolutionary War Soldiers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Molly Pitcher (about 600 feet away); Major André (about 700 feet away); Andre & Despard House (about 700 feet away); The Salvation Army (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Armstrong, Sr. Wikipedia biography. (Submitted on July 25, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

2. Kittanning Expedition. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on July 25, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

3. John Armstrong. "Find A Grave" entry. (Submitted on July 25, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, January 1, 2004
4. Inset
Kittanning Destroyed medal, c. 1760, commemorates the victory at Kittanning over the Delaware Indians
Courtesy of the PA Historical and Museum Commission
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, January 1, 2004
5. Inset
1768 document signed by John Armstrong for surveying and making a plan for 140 lots near Carlisle.
Cumberland County Historical Society, Carlisle PA
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 25, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 68 times since then and 11 times this year. Last updated on February 14, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 25, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021