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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Bridger in Carbon County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

The Corey House

 
 
The Corey House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2020
1. The Corey House Marker
Inscription.  
known as the Pillsbury House
Built 1907
has been placed on the
National Register
Of Historic Places
by the United States
Department of the Interior

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureIndustry & CommerceNotable Buildings.
 
Location. 45° 17.754′ N, 108° 54.416′ W. Marker is in Bridger, Montana, in Carbon County. Marker is at the intersection of North E Street and East Broadway Avenue, on the left when traveling east on North E Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 106 North E Street, Bridger MT 59014, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Methodist Episcopal Church and Parsonage (approx. half a mile away); Jim Bridger, Mountain Man (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Jim Bridger, Mountain Man (approx. half a mile away); A Trail Woefully Hard to Travel: The Bridger Cut-Off (approx. 1.3 miles away); The Pryor Mountains and Raptor Country (approx.
The Corey House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2020
2. The Corey House and Marker
2.9 miles away); The Pryor Mountains (approx. 2.9 miles away); John Gibson House (approx. 6.6 miles away); Northern Pacific Railroad Depot (approx. 6.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bridger.
 
More about this marker. Records show that the Montana Historical Society has created a marker for the Corey House, but it is not to be found on the building. The text of the markers is :

In 1906, speculative investor Leonard A. Corey and wife Mary set up housekeeping in a tent along the Clark’s Fork River, awaiting completion of their new home. Several years before, Corey, brother-in-law Samuel H. Glidden, and others had formed the Bridger Canyon Oil Company. Company stock rapidly increased until the firm was capitalized at $1,500,000. In July of 1907, Corey filed thirty oil placer locations, and within two weeks twenty-two tons of drilling equipment was enroute to Bridger. The Coreys moved into their fine new residence at the height of this financial prosperity. Completed in May of 1907, the home reveals the architectural transition from Queen Anne to Arts and Crafts styles. An irregular floor plan, two-story polygonal bay, and gabled roof reflect the older Queen Anne charm, while the broad porch, wood shingles, sandstone, and masonry work display fashionable Arts and Crafts characteristics. Beautiful beveled, leaded, and stained glass windows further reveal quality craftsmanship. Though Corey never struck oil and suffered financially, he remained undaunted. A mining venture took him to Alaska in 1913, and Corey was never heard from in Bridger again. Today, the stylistically sophisticated Corey House and the Glidden House next door recall the short-lived wealth of these early speculators.
 
The Corey House image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2020
3. The Corey House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 16, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 16, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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