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Hallettsville in Lavaca County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

American Legion Hudgeons Post 230

 
 
American Legion Hudgeons Post 230 Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 8, 2021
1. American Legion Hudgeons Post 230 Marker
Inscription.  

Following World War I, Local Veterans of Hallettsville created the Hudgeons Post 230 in 1920. They wanted to serve fellow veterans and the community through an American Legion Post. The branch was named Hudgeons Post in honor of Mr. And Mrs. Eli Hudgeons who lived in Hallettsville and both died during WWI. Thomas Eli Hudgeons registered for the draft in 1917 at age 19 and married Margaret Singleton just two weeks before his departure for France. Thomas died on February 5, 1918 when the transport ship, Tuscania, was torpedoed by a German submarine. Margaret Hudgeons died January 24, 1919, of pneumonia while she was a Red Cross nurse in San Antonio.

The Hudgeons Post 230 was open for membership to all who served between 1917 and 1918 in the U.S. Army, Navy, or Marine Corps. The dues were 50 cents per year. The Post rented three rooms in the J.H. Appelt Building above the Post Office in Hallettsville. In 1958, the city leased the Recreation Hall, built by the National Youth Administration during the Great Depression, to the Post and, in 1963, the Post purchased the Recreation Hall. In 1965, the Hall burned down, along with the Post
American Legion Hudgeons Post 230 and Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 8, 2021
2. American Legion Hudgeons Post 230 and Marker
records.

The current American Legion Hall was built in 1965 following the fire. The Hudgeons Post continues to improve conditions for veterans and citizens of Lavaca County. They follow the four pillars of the American Legion: Veterans, Defense, Americanism and youth. The Post has been very active in the community, providing scholarships and supplying finances to improve public spaces around the city. The post continues to thrive under their motto: In Peace As In War - We Serve.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18904.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsWar, World I.
 
Location. 29° 27.112′ N, 96° 56.667′ W. Marker is in Hallettsville, Texas, in Lavaca County. Marker is at the intersection of Park Road 3 and East Park Street, on the left when traveling north on Park Road 3. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hallettsville TX 77964, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Richardson Chapel United Methodist Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Entrance to Old Estate of John Hallett (about 600 feet away); Old Hanging Tree (about 600 feet away); Murchison Masonic Lodge (approx. 0.2 miles away); 50th Anniversary of Battle of Galveston
The view of the American Legion Hudgeons Post 230 Marker from the road image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 8, 2021
3. The view of the American Legion Hudgeons Post 230 Marker from the road
(approx. half a mile away); Lavaca County Courthouse (approx. half a mile away); First Baptist Church of Hallettsville (approx. half a mile away); First National Bank of Hallettsville (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hallettsville.
 
Also see . . .  SS Tuscania (1914).
SS Tuscania was a luxury liner of the Anchor Line, a subsidiary of the Cunard Line and named after Tuscania, Italy. In 1918 the ship was torpedoed and sunk by the German U-boat UB-77 while transporting American troops to Europe with the loss of 210 lives. Source: Wikipedia
(Submitted on February 19, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 19, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 19, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021