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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Edward King Tung Chen

(November 30, 1909 - October 16, 1957)

 
 
Edward King Tung Chen Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 5, 2021
1. Edward King Tung Chen Marker
Inscription.  

Born in San Francisco, California as Chen Yuk Chow, Edward K.T. Chen, the son of Chin Yuen Yee and Chin Luk Oi, had a profound impact on the lives of Americans, particularly those of Chinese descent. In 1928, he attended Columbia University in New York City. While there, he worked as a typesetter and reporter for the Chinese Nationalist Daily, a Chinese language newspaper.

In November 1932, Chen came to Galveston as Secretary of the Republic of China's first Vice Consulate for the Southern U.S. The office moved to Houston the next year, and he simultaneously attended the University of Houston, where he earned bachelor's and master's degrees and became the first Chinese-American professor in the city. In 1934, Chen married Janie Ng (d. 1965); the couple had two children.

While in Houston, Chen helped to increase the visibility of Chinese and Chinese Americans. In 1937, his lobbying efforts helped to defeat a bill that would have prevented Chinese from owning land in Texas. In 1940, he helped organize the forerunner of the first Chinese Church in Houston. During World War II, he was a spokesman for the Republic
Edward King Tung Chen Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 5, 2021
2. Edward King Tung Chen Marker
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of China, which promoted Chen to Deputy Consul in 1948. During the Korean War, he worked to convince the federal government that most Chinese Americans were loyal to the U.S., translated Chinese intelligence and taught Cantonese to Federal Bureau of Investigation agents. In 1954, Chen was the founding President of the Houston Lodge of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance, fighting prejudice directed toward Chinese Texans. Today Chen is remembered as a diplomat and educator whose work made a lasting impact on the lives of Chinese Americans and others in Houston and throughout the United States.
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15805.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Asian Americans. A significant historical month for this entry is November 1932.
 
Location. 29° 43.568′ N, 95° 33.233′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is on Westcenter Drive 0.1 miles south of Richmond Avenue, on the left when traveling south. The marker is located in front of the Tracy Gee Community Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3599 Westcenter, Houston TX 77042, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Early Settlers of Piney Point (approx. 2.1 miles away); Dairy (Alief) (approx. 2˝ miles away); John Taylor's Piney Point League (approx.
The view of the Edward King Tung Chen Marker from the street image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 5, 2021
3. The view of the Edward King Tung Chen Marker from the street
2.8 miles away); Early Settlement South of the Bayou (approx. 2.8 miles away); German Settlements North of the Bayou (approx. 2.8 miles away); Moore Log House (approx. 3.3 miles away); The Fritz Schroeder Home (approx. 3.4 miles away); Alief Cemetery (approx. 3.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 10, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 10, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 10, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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May. 6, 2021