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Rome in Floyd County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Here Lies in Honored Glory an American Soldier

 
 
Pvt. Charles W. Graves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
1. Pvt. Charles W. Graves Marker
Inscription.  
Pvt. Charles W. Graves
In March, 1922 the troopship Cambria returned the final 1,065 bodies of the known dead to the United States. The last body removed was Charles W. Graves, designated as “Representative of the Nation's Known Dead of The World War.”

On April 2 a memorial service was held at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Four Army generals and four Navy admirals carried the body of Private Graves. Thousands of Gold Star mothers, U.S. Senators, Representatives and Governors attended.

President Warren G. Harding's eulogy, delivered beside Graves' flag-draped casket, contained these lines: They have set for all of us the perfect example of service and sacrifice and it is well that their associates should, through this tribute, remind the nation of its eternal obligation to prove worthy of the devotion its sons have shown for it.

National plans directed that America's Known Soldier be placed beside The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.. The Graves family requested his body be returned to his native Georgia.

Graves was interred at Antioch Church Cemetery,
Here Lies in Honored Glory an American Soldier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
2. Here Lies in Honored Glory an American Soldier Marker
Graves is buried below the white marble slab.
Click or scan to see
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Collier Springs Road on April 6, 1922. Hundreds marched from Broad Street and Second Avenue to the small wooden church. Armistice Day services were conducted there November 11, 1922.

On September 22, 1923 Graves' body was removed from Antioch and interred at Myrtle Hill — his third burial.

On the fifth anniversary of the end of The World War, Armistice Day 1923 was observed at the Myrtle Hill site. Shanklin - Attaway Post 5, The American Legion, provided the marble slab and two bronze tablets which are Graves' memorial. Three 1904 model machine guns have stood guard at the site since that date. Hundreds attended the service, including Governor Clifford Walker, every civic group in Rome, and most of Rome/Floyd County's school children.

Graves' commanding officer, Gen. C. F. Spence, attended the memorial service, together with Gen. E. M. Lewis, Commander, 8th Corp Area, who delivered the Address of Dedication, saying, “He has given all that he had … what could any man do more?”

In Memoriam
Byard Gordon Quigg, USMC
Killed in Action WWII 1944

 
Erected by Given by Julia Quigg Dodd and Family.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: War, World IWar, World II.
 
Location. 34° 
Pvt. Charles W. Graves burial site image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
3. Pvt. Charles W. Graves burial site
15.031′ N, 85° 10.696′ W. Marker is in Rome, Georgia, in Floyd County. Memorial can be reached from the intersection of South Broad Street and Myrtle Street Southwest. Marker is in Veterans Plaza section of Myrtle Hill Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rome GA 30161, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Fallen (here, next to this marker); Myrtle Hill Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); The McDougald Family of Georgia (within shouting distance of this marker); Anchor Duck Mills World War II Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Vietnam War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Georgia’s Paul Revere (within shouting distance of this marker); Ellen Louise Axson Wilson (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Hightower Monument (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rome.
 
Supplemental marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
4. Supplemental marker
The top plaque on the grave reads:
Charles W. Graves
Private soldier
Born March 8, 1892
Enlisted August 16, 1917
Company M — 117 Infantry
3rd Tennessee Regiment
30th Division
Killed on the Hindenburg Line
October 5, 1918 near Nuroy, France
Supplemental marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
5. Supplemental marker
The bottom plaque on the grave reads: The last of the nation's dead to return to his native soil. This body was honored by the government of The United States of America as representative of its known dead in the World War.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 16, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 16, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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May. 15, 2021