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Grand Junction in Hardeman County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Bird Dog & Field Trial Capital of the World

 
 
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By Tom Bosse, April 16, 2021
1. The Bird Dog & Field Trial Capital of the World Marker
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The following is the Time-Line of some of the Leading Events to Grand Junction Tennessee becoming The Bird Dog & Field Trial Capital of the World

1870 (About) After the Civil war ended, West Tennessee became a mecca for quail hunting. West Tennessee saw sportsmen from many parts of the country bringing their pointing dogs to the area in pursuit of the great sport of quail hunting. Grand Junction with its two railroads providing good transportation to the area and became an idea location to pursue this sport. Other sportsmen came to West Tennessee and East Arkansas area with the Retrievers to enjoy the bountiful waterfowl hunting the area offered.

The area saw dog kennels being established, dog breeders, dog handlers and trainers coming to the Grand Junction area that supported this sportsmen’s paradise. The most notable being that of Hobart Ames who acquired the famous Charlottesville Field Trial Kennels from Field Trial Hall of Famer Edward Dexter. Mr. Ames parked his private Pullman rail car in Grand Junction as he took up winter residence on his nearby plantation.

1874 The competitive

The Bird Dog & Field Trial Capital of the World Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, April 16, 2021
2. The Bird Dog & Field Trial Capital of the World Marker
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environment that occurred as to who had the best bird dogs led to establishing and the holding of the first field trial in America just west of Grand Junction, Tennessee.

1879 Count Noble was whelped in Wales.

1880 Count Noble brought to the United States. Count Noble participated in field trials in the Grand Junction area.

1891 Champion Count Noble died. A book has been written about Count Noble reporting him as “The Greatest Dog That Ever Lived!”.

1895 The National Field Trial Champion Association was organized.

1896 The first National Championship Field Trial was run in West Point, Mississippi in 1896. (Won by Count Gladstone IV – son of Count Noble. Handled by James M. Avent from nearby hickory Valley). Jim Avent was born in 1860. He was one of the most famous trainers and handlers of all times.

1899 (About) Hobart Ames established the world famous Ames Plantation on the outskirts of Grand Junction, Tennessee and became president of the National Field Trial Champion Association.

1900 + 1901 National Championship held south of Grand Junction, Tennessee.

1902 National Championship held on the Ames Plantation, Grand Junction, Tennessee for the first time.

1909 First

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Pointer, Manitoba Rap to win the National Championship.

1915 National Championship finds a permanent home on the Ames Plantation.

1920 Mary Montrose wins National Championship for the third time.

1925 Becky Broomhill wins National Championship for the third time.

1930 Feagan's Mohawk Pal wins National Championship for the third time. The only setter to win the National Championship three times.

1936 Jim Avent died – Interred in Grand Junction, Tennessee. Elected to Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1956.

1945 Mr. Hobart Ames died. He was born in 1865. He was elected to Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1954.

1946 Ariel wins The National Championship for the third time – (In 125 + years, there are only four bird dogs to win the National Championship for three times.)

1950 Mrs. Julia Colony Ames died. She made significant contributions via her Will including providing the National Field Trial Championship a permanent home on the Ames Plantation and establishing the Hobart Ames Foundation. She was elected to the Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1973.

1953 National Field Trial Champion King Buck wins the National Open Retriever Championship stake for the second time. The photograph of King Buck

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appears on the National Duck stamp in 1959. The only dog to ever receive this honor. King Buck was elected to the Retriever Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1992.

1954 The Field Trial Hall of Fame was established. Five of the greatest dogs and five distinguished field trailers were elected.

1959 Count Noble was elected to the Field Trial Hall of Fame.

1972 NAFC-FC-CNFC River Oaks Corky won the National Amateur Retriever Championship for the second time. Corky earned the most points of any Retriever. Corky was elected to the Retriever Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1992.

1980 Saighton's Scud, the famous English Springer Spaniel becomes the only Springer Spaniel to ever win three (3) major championships in a single year. Owned and handled by Dr. Janet Christensen. Scud was elected to the Springer Spaniel Field Trial Hall of Fame in 2000.

1988 The Bird Dog Foundation, Inc. was established and received Section 501 (c) (3) status from the Internal revenue Service. The Bird Dog Foundation provides the corporate umbrella under which the National Bird Dog Museum, the Field Trial Hall of Fame, the Wildlife Heritage Center (the Foundation’s Education Arm), the National Retriever Museum, and the Continental Bird Dog Breeds Wing operate. Combined, these entities embrace a Grand National Sporting Dog Center. The Bird Dog Foundation has identified, recognized and honored some 40 breeds of bird dogs representing the Retriever, Pointing and Flushing Breeds. In addition, the Sporting Dog Center is the scene of a wide variety of bird dog related activity and events as well as numerous community social and business activity.

1991 The National Bird Dog Museum was dedicated.

1992 The Hitch Hiker Owned by W.O. (Bill) Fitch, and handled by Randy Downs wins The National Championship.

1993 NFC-AFC Candlewood's Tanks A Lot wins the National Open Retriever Championship stake for the third time. The only Retriever to ever win that prestigious stake three times. Making her the most outstanding Retriever in the world of Retrievers and in the world of Retrievers in field trial competition. Lottie as she was nationally known was inducted into the Retriever Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1997.

1994 The Field Trial Hall of Fame building was dedicated – many dogs from the Retriever, Pointing and Flushing groups have been elected to the Field Trial Hall of Fame.

1996 The Wildlife Heritage Center was dedicated.

1998 FC-AFC Hattie McBunn wins the National Amateur Retriever Championship. Owned by J.M. (Mac) and L.K. DuBose. NAFC Hattie McBunn was inducted into the Field Trial Hall of Fame in 2001.

1999 The taxidermic body of Count Noble finds a new and permanent home in the Bird Dog Foundation’s Sporting Dog Center in Grand Junction, Tennessee.

2004 The National Retriever Museum was dedicated.

2006 A major English Spring Spaniel field trial was held just south of Grand Junction’s neighboring town of La Grange. This field trial has turned out to be a local important annual competition. A first for this area.

2012 A first for Grand Junction – The American Kennel Club held their Annual Pointing Breed Gun Dog Championship Field Trial on the Ames Plantation.

2012 A new building was added to the Bird Dog Foundation’s Sporting Dog Center to accommodate the displays / exhibits of the various Continental Breeds.

2012 A section of Tennessee State highway #18 running by Grand Junction was proclaimed as the National Bird Dog Highway by the representatives of the Tennessee General Assembly.

2013 Waterfowl hunting and campaigning Retrievers in field trials have been held for many years in West Tennessee and in the Mississippi flyway areas. However, another first for Grand Junction – a major Retriever Field Trial was held on the Ames Plantation.

2013 State of Tennessee – House of Representatives – House Joint Resolution No. 142 honors Grand junction as "The Bird Dog and Dog and Field Trial Capital of the World". This Resolution is signed by the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the Speakers of the Tennessee House and Senate and the local State Representative.

2014 Shadow Oak Bo wins the National Championship for the second time. Owned by N.G. (Butch) Houston and Dr. John Dorminy. Handled by Robin Gates.

2014 The complete display here publicly honors and recognizes Grand Junction as The Bird Dog and Field Trial Capital of the World.

Notes: There are still other facts about people and dogs, breeding, training, events, etc. that further support this Grand junction claim.
 
Erected 2014.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsSports. A significant historical date for this entry is November 7, 2014.
 
Location. 35° 3.034′ N, 89° 12.43′ W. Marker is in Grand Junction, Tennessee, in Hardeman County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 18/57 and State Highway 57, on the right when traveling north on State Highway 18/57. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 57 Route 18, Grand Junction TN 38039, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Woodlawn (approx. ¾ mile away); The Bird Dog Foundation, Inc. (approx. 0.8 miles away); First Bird Dog Field Trials (approx. 0.8 miles away); Grand Junction (approx. 1.1 miles away); The Gloster - Anderson Graveyard (approx. 1.6 miles away); Immanuel Church (approx. 2.1 miles away); LaGrange (approx. 2.1 miles away); Grierson's Raid (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Grand Junction.

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 24, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 21, 2021, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 21, 2021, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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May. 6, 2021