Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boerne in Kendall County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Adolph Toepperwein

 
 
Adolph Toepperwein Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 26, 2021
1. Adolph Toepperwein Marker
Inscription.  

In the 1880s, elements of the Old West were fading and became romanticized through Wild West shows. These promotions created opportunities for those with skills, including sharp-shooters. Adolph (Ad) Toepperwein was born in Boerne on October 16, 1869 to Johanna (Bergmann) and Emil Albrecht Ferdinand Toepperwein, who immigrated to Texas from Prussia in 1850. Ad's father was a gunsmith who built and designed guns and, because of this, Ad became proficient with firearms at a young age. By the age of ten, he could outshoot many veteran marksmen. After his father's death, Ad moved to San Antonio to perfect his shooting skills.

In 1889, he quit his cartoonist job at the San Antonio Express and went to New York seeking a Vaudeville job. For two years, he shared the stage with many Vaudeville acts. He then joined the Orin Brothers Circus, with which he toured for eight years. In 1901, the Winchester Repeating Firearms Company signed him to a long-term contract as an exhibition shooter. On a visit to the Winchester plant in Connecticut in 1902, Ad met a cartridge assembler named Elizabeth Servaty. After a short courtship, they
The Adolph Toepperwein Marker along sidewalk on Main street image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 26, 2021
2. The Adolph Toepperwein Marker along sidewalk on Main street
Click or scan to see
this page online
were married. Ad taught her how to shoot and they began touring as a husband and wife shooting team known as the Wonderful Toepperweins. They traveled for over forty years until Elizabeth died in 1945. Ad retired in 1951 and died on March 4, 1962. Ad was a long-time member of the Boerne Schuetzen Verein, was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966, made Ripley's Believe It or Not and the Guinness Book of World Records. One of Boerne's most famous sons is remembered and respected for his many shooting records over the years.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17654.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Sports. A significant historical date for this entry is March 4, 1962.
 
Location. 29° 47.233′ N, 98° 43.74′ W. Marker is in Boerne, Texas, in Kendall County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street and West Hosack Street, on the right when traveling south on South Main Street. The marker is located at the street near a bench. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 706 South Main Street, Boerne TX 78006, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Weyrich Building (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Peter's Catholic Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Staffel Family and the Staffel Store (approx. ¼ mile away); Homesite of Albert Paul Kutzer
The view of the Adolph Toepperwein Marker from the street image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 26, 2021
3. The view of the Adolph Toepperwein Marker from the street
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Fabra Smokehouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); German Music in Boerne (approx. half a mile away); Kendall County (approx. half a mile away); Kendall County Courthouse (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boerne.
 
Also see . . .  Toepperwein, Adolph [Ad] (1869–1962).
Ad Toepperwein's first official record was made at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. In 1906, during a three-day exhibition, he made 19,999 hits out of 20,000 hand-thrown wood blocks. It was in San Antonio during a ten-day period from December 13 to December 22, 1907, where Toepperwein made his famous world record and performed what the San Antonio Daily Express described as “the greatest shooting exhibition ever given.” Using three 1903 model Winchester .22 automatics, he fired at a total of 72,500 wood blocks and missed only 9 during sixty-eight and one-half hours of target shooting. He used up all of the ammunition for sale in the city.
(Submitted on April 27, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 27, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 27, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 27, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=172076

Paid Advertisement
May. 13, 2021