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Roanoke, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Virginian GE EL-C Electric Locomotive #135

 
 
Virginian GE EL-C Electric Locomotive #135 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 24, 2021
1. Virginian GE EL-C Electric Locomotive #135 Marker
Inscription.  
Manufacturer: General Electric, 1956
Production era: 1955-1957
Length: 69 feet 6 inches
Height: 15 feet 10 inches
Weight: 348,000 pounds (lbs.)
Horsepower: 3,300
Tractive effort: 98,000 lbs.
Maximum speed: 65 miles per hour (mph)

General Electric produced 12 EL-C locomotives, #130-141, all for the Virginian Railway. Virginian electrified its tracks with overhead electric lines between Roanoke, Virginia, and Mullins, West Virginia, in April 1925, a distance of 133.6 miles.

The EL-C is powered by a water cooled electrical device called an ignitron rectifier, which is an electron cylinder filled with mercury through which an alternating current is passed to produce direct current pulses. The design was used as a basic for Pennsylvania Railroad's E-44 units that were built from 1960 to 1963.

135 pulled coal trains from 1956 to 1962. The 12 EL-C locomotives were acquired by Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railway in the 1959 merger with the Virginian Railway.

These locomotives were removed from service in 1962 when

Virginian GE EL-C Electric Locomotive #135 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 24, 2021
2. Virginian GE EL-C Electric Locomotive #135 Marker
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the N&W dismantled the electrified lines in favor of an all diesel fleet. This locomotive is the only one that was painted in the schemes of all the railroads it served.

After the dieselization of N&W, the EL-Cs were sold to the New Haven Railroad for operation between New Haven, Connecticut, and New York City. Eleven of the locomotives were reclassified as EF-4s #300-#310, and the remaining unit was used for spare parts. Ten of the remaining EL-Cs survived on the Penn Central Transportation Company and later on Conrail, where they were reclassified E-33, #4601-4610. They were retired in 1891 when Conrail ended its electrified operations. Although the EL-Cs proved to be a very successful design, no mere were produced due to the small number of railroads with electric lines.
 
Erected by Virginia Museum of Transportation, Inc.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1925.
 
Location. 37° 16.399′ N, 79° 56.775′ W. Marker is in Roanoke, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Norfolk Avenue Southwest and 3rd Street Southwest, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 303 Norfolk Ave SW, Roanoke VA 24016, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wabash E8A Diesel-Electric #1009 (here, next to this marker); Chesapeake Western ALCO T-6 Diesel-Electric #10

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(here, next to this marker); Norfolk & Western ALCO RS-3 Diesel Electric #300 (a few steps from this marker); Chesapeake Western DS-4-4-660 #662 (a few steps from this marker); Norfolk & Western Class CF Caboose #518302 (a few steps from this marker); Virginia Central Porter Rod Driven Locomotive #3 (a few steps from this marker); Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Boxcar #2305 (a few steps from this marker); Depressed Center Flatcar APWX #1002 (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Roanoke.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 29, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 29, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 17, 2021