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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Buckhannon in Upshur County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Pringle Tree

 
 
Pringle Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 16, 2021
1. Pringle Tree Marker
Inscription.  To the east (1½ miles), at the mouth of Turkey Run, stood the famous Pringle Tree, so-called because in the cavity of this old sycamore, John and Samuel Pringle, who had fled from Fort Pitt, lived two years.
 
Erected 1969 by West Virginia Historic Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Revolutionary.
 
Location. 39° 1.14′ N, 80° 13.732′ W. Marker is near Buckhannon, West Virginia, in Upshur County. Marker is on Clarksburg Road (West Virginia Route 20) 0.1 miles north of Pringle Tree Road (Local Route 119/2), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1340 Clarksburg Rd, Buckhannon WV 26201, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Upshur County Veterans War Dead Memorial (approx. 1.4 miles away); D. D. T. Farnsworth (approx. 1˝ miles away); Resting Place (approx. 1.6 miles away); George R. Latham (approx. 1.6 miles away); The Bassel House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Destruction at the Courthouse
Pringle Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 16, 2021
2. Pringle Tree Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 1.7 miles away); Buckhannon / Frontier Days (approx. 1.8 miles away); The History Center (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buckhannon.
 
Regarding Pringle Tree. Take Pringle Tree Road to a left on Pringle Tree Park Road (Route 20/6) to the park where the Pringle Tree stood.
 
Also see . . .  . Pringle Tree entry in West Virginia Explorer. Excerpt:
Deserters from the British-American forces mustered at Fort Pitt, at Pittsburgh, during the French and Indian War, they found the wilderness along the river ideal for hiding.

In 1768 John returned from a visit to a trading post on the South Branch of the Potomac River and became convinced that he and Samuel were no longer considered renegades. In 1769 they led a small group of settlers back to the valley to establish a permanent settlement.
(Submitted on May 17, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 17, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 17, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 31 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 17, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of Pringle Tree Park, nearby. There may be another marker at the park and if so, it should be added on its own page • Can you help?

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Jun. 13, 2021