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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lake City in Hinsdale County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

A Town with Three Names

 
 
A Town with Three Names Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, July 8, 2021
1. A Town with Three Names Marker
Inscription.  

Burrows Park, Argentum, or Whitecross the name may have changed, yet the community and its place in history have remained the same. Situated within a five-mile long grassy meadow known as Burrows Park, clusters of hotels, blacksmith shops, saloons, roadhouses, meat markets, general merchandise stores, sawmills, homes, and mining ventures came and went with the passing years.

•Burrows Park - was the original name for the meadow that provided a good location for home sites in an otherwise mountainous terrain. The Burrows Park Post Office was located in the mining camp of Argentum from 1876 to 1882.

• Argentum - was creatively named for the argentiflour ores found in the area. This mining camp had two stores, three hotels, a blacksmith shop, and twelve houses (cabins). Nearby was a sawmill and the Whitecross Mine.

• Whitecross - was named after a nearby mountain with a noticeable white cross in a geologic formation. The Whitecross Post Office was located in Argentum from 1882 to 1887, and was relocated to the former mining camp of Tellurium City from 1887 to 1912.

The nearby
The A Town with Three Names Marker is the marker on the left of the two markers image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, July 8, 2021
2. The A Town with Three Names Marker is the marker on the left of the two markers
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community of Tellurium City, founded in July, 1875, was also named after an ore found in the area. The Post Office in 1875 was located near the junction of Adams Creek and the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River near the head of Burrows Park. It had a "population less than five hundred men and enough valley vocalists (burros) to make the night hideous."
Silver World, 17 July, 1875.

Captions
1. The Post Office at Whitecross in 1893. Seven year old Clarence E. Wright is holding the lead rope for Bushy the Donkey loaded with supplies.
-Photo courtesy of Lake City Museum - Hinsdale County Historical Society, Clarence E. Wright Collection

2. "Burrows Park Post Office has been changed to Whitecross."
Silver World, 1882


3. Tellurium City was one community in Burrows Park. Burrows Park was named for Albert W. Burrows who first prospected in the region in the 1870s.
-Photo circa 1910, courtesy of Denver Public Library, Western History Department

4. The Post Office at Whitecross in 1889. Postmaster Harry E. Wright with his family. Three-year old Clarence E. Wright is on the burro supported by his father.
-Photo courtesy of Lake City Museum - Hinsdale County Historical Society, Clarence E. Wright Collection

5. Advertisement, July 24, 1888
-Photo courtesy of Lake City
The view of the two markers from the road image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, July 8, 2021
3. The view of the two markers from the road
Museum - Hinsdale County Historical Society

6. "Burrows Park - sometimes called Argentum ... The population of the camp varies from 10 to 100. This place is called by some people "Tellurium," for a kind of mineral which was claimed to be found here."
- Crofutt's Grip-Sack Guide of Colorado 1885

 
Erected by U.S. Department of the Interior - Alpine Loop.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce. A significant historical month for this entry is July 1875.
 
Location. 37° 56.65′ N, 107° 29.647′ W. Marker is near Lake City, Colorado, in Hinsdale County. Marker is on County Highway 30, 1˝ miles east of County Highway 12, on the right when traveling west. The marker is located along the Alpine Loop about 20 miles west of Lake City. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lake City CO 81235, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tellurium or Was It Whitecross (here, next to this marker); Rose Lime Kiln (approx. 2˝ miles away); White Death (approx. 2.6 miles away); Bonanza Empire Chief (approx. 2.6 miles away); Animas Forks (approx. 4.3 miles away); The William Duncan House (approx. 4.3 miles away); Lee's Legacy (approx. 4˝ miles away); Ute Homeland (approx. 5.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lake City.
 
Also see . . .
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 Alpine Loop.
The Alpine Loop is truly a backcountry experience. Make sure someone knows your travel plans and do your homework before you start your trip. Make sure you have plenty of water, food and fuel to make it to your destination. Electronics and wireless devises DO NOT work in most places on the Alpine Loop. It is recommended that you download or print hard copy maps prior to your trip. The Alpine Loop Backcountry Byway is a rugged 4x4 road that winds through the spectacular scenery of the San Juan Mountains, connecting Lake City, Silverton, and Ouray. The Alpine Loop byway traverses passes up to 12,800 feet while showcasing old mines, ghost towns, natural wonders, beautiful wildflowers, and abundant wildlife. Alpine Loop is an avenue for exploring nature and history amidst thrilling views and stunning geography. Tackling the loop in its entirety is easily an all-day experience event. However, the main loop is only part of the experience; miles of designated side routes allow visitors to either take a short tour or extend their trip to multiple days. For more information, please contact the Gunnison Field Office.
(Submitted on July 24, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 25, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 24, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 75 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 25, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jan. 20, 2022