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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Indianola in Calhoun County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

German Immigration Through Karlshafen

 
 
German Immigration Through Karlshafen Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 30, 2021
1. German Immigration Through Karlshafen Marker
Inscription.  On April 20, 1842, a group of nobles convened at Biebrich am Rhein and incorporated as the Adelsverein. They elected Count Karl von Castell as their president and then pledged a goal to purchase land in Texas. From 1821 to 1910, more than five million Germans emigrated, more than any other European country. Providing a potential escape from this misery was the Adelsverein. The Adelsverein accounted for 7,380 of those during three years of operation from 1844-1847 but their advertising enticed many other German immigrants who utilized the footholds that the Verein had established to come to Texas. One popular slogan was "Geh mit ins Texas," or "Go with us to Texas." Prince Karl of Solms-Braunfels, one of the members and a cousin of England's Queen Victoria, was chosen to execute their mission in Texas as the Commissioner General in America. With his determination, Karlshafen developed into a significant port.

With revolutions and discontent in Europe in the 1840s, many Germans, as well as other nationalities, continued to pour into the German infrastructure eventually established by the Verein at Galveston and Karlshafen. Indian Point
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in Karlshafen, a shell beach separated from the mainland by a chain of lakes and marshes, was a successful debarkation point for thousands of German immigrants. Many followed the route to the Verein settlements of New Braunfels and Fredericksburg in the Texas Hill Country but some settled other areas of Texas including Calhoun County itself. The city of Indianola, born of Karlshafen, became a major port that helped settle the west. At a high price with the loss of many lives early on, these German immigrants made lasting contributions to the culture of Texas in their pursuit of a better life.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17800.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Settlements & Settlers. A significant historical date for this entry is April 20, 1842.
 
Location. 28° 32.726′ N, 96° 31.227′ W. Marker is near Indianola, Texas, in Calhoun County. Marker is on North Ocean Drive, one mile north of State Highway 316, on the left when traveling north. The marker is located at a small roadside pullout. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Port Lavaca TX 77979, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Judge Henry Joseph Huck (here, next to this marker); The War Between U.S. and Mexico (within shouting distance of this marker); The German Emigration Company
The German Immigration Through Karlshafen Marker is the marker on the left of the two markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 30, 2021
2. The German Immigration Through Karlshafen Marker is the marker on the left of the two markers
(within shouting distance of this marker); Harris & Morgan's Steamship Yacht (within shouting distance of this marker); California Gold Fields (within shouting distance of this marker); Name Change (within shouting distance of this marker); A Steady Movement of European Immigrants (within shouting distance of this marker); A Beef Canning Plant (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Indianola.
 
Also see . . .
1. Adelsverein.
The Adelsverein, also known as the Mainzer Verein, the Texas-Verein, and the German Emigration Company, was officially named the Verein zum Schutze deutscher Einwanderer in Texas (Society for the Protection of German Immigrants in Texas). Provisionally organized on April 20, 1842, by twenty-one German noblemen at Biebrich on the Rhine, near Mainz, the society represents a significant effort to establish a new Germany on Texas soil by means of an organized mass emigration. Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on September 21, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Germans.
The largest ethnic
The view of the two markers from the road image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 30, 2021
3. The view of the two markers from the road
group in Texas derived directly from Europe was persons of German birth or descent. As early as 1850, they constituted more than 5 percent of the total Texas population, a proportion that remained constant through the remainder of the nineteenth century. Intermarriage has blurred ethnic lines, but the 1990 United States census revealed that 1,175,888 Texans claimed pure and 1,775,838 partial German ancestry, for a total of 2,951,726, or 17˝ percent of the total population. Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on September 21, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Carl Prinz zu Solms-Braunfels (1812-1875) image. Click for full size.
Public Domain - Wikipedia, circa 1840s
4. Carl Prinz zu Solms-Braunfels (1812-1875)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 21, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 20, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 422 times since then and 139 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 21, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jul. 21, 2024