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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Waco in McLennan County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Burleson Quadrangle

 
 
Burleson Quadrangle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Hoch, September 23, 2021
1. Burleson Quadrangle Marker
Inscription.  
Dr. Rufus C. Burleson was the first president of Baylor's Waco Campus and Burleson Quadrangle was named in his honor. With the completion of Baylor's four original buildings - Old Main (1886), Georgia Burleson Hall (1888), The F. L. Carroll Chapel and Library (1903), and the George W. Carroll Science Building (1903), the quadrangle took on its current appearance, and has since that time served as a social area and a link to Baylor's history and tradition.

Burleson Quadrangle has often been the site of evolving social norms and customs at Baylor. During the 1920s the "ring out" ceremony, held every spring in Burleson Quadrangle, became a Baylor tradition and is still performed today. The ceremony involves the passing of an ivy chain from senior students to junior students, and symbolizes the passing of custodianship of the historic bells that are located in the quadrangle to Baylor's next graduating class. The ceremony was originally performed by female students, but has since grown to also include male students. Since 1945, students have participated in the passing of the key ceremony, also held in the quadrangle at gradation time.
Burleson Quadrangle and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Hoch, September 23, 2021
2. Burleson Quadrangle and Marker
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The key opens a Baylor time capsule that was placed in the quadrangle during the university's 1945 centennial.

Burleson Quadrangle is the location of a bronze sculpture of Dr. Burleson, unveiled in 1905 and created by renowned Italian-born Texas sculptor Pompeo Coppini (1870-1957). The centennial monument, also located within the quadrangle, was constructed in 1945 using stones from Tryton Hall (formerly located at the Independence campus) and several buildings on the Waco Campus.
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15845.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EducationSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1945.
 
Location. 31° 32.75′ N, 97° 7.173′ W. Marker is in Waco, Texas, in McLennan County. Marker can be reached from Speight Avenue east of South 7th Street, on the left when traveling east. The marker is located in the central walkway in the northeast portion of the Burleson Quadrangle, near the statue of Dr. Burleson. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Waco TX 76706, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Main (within shouting distance of this marker); Georgia Burleson and Early Female Education at Baylor (within shouting distance of this marker); The Texas Collection (within shouting distance
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of this marker); Baylor University (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); William McKendree Lambdin (approx. 0.6 miles away); Samuel Johan Forsgard (approx. 0.6 miles away); Thomas Hudson Barron (approx. 0.6 miles away); Confederate Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waco.
 
Also see . . .
1. Rufus Columbus Burleson. (Submitted on October 13, 2021, by Kevin Hoch of Waco, Texas.)
2. Old Main / Burleson Quadrangle. (Submitted on October 13, 2021, by Kevin Hoch of Waco, Texas.)
3. Ring Out, Passing of the Key Ceremonies To Be Held May 2. (Submitted on October 13, 2021, by Kevin Hoch of Waco, Texas.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 13, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 13, 2021, by Kevin Hoch of Waco, Texas. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 13, 2021, by Kevin Hoch of Waco, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Dec. 1, 2021