Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Aoyama Tree

 
 
Aoyama Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 10, 2021
1. Aoyama Tree Marker
Inscription.  
Ficus Macrophylla (Moreton Bay Fig) planted circa 1920.
Declared 2008, Historic-Cultural Monument No. 920, Cultural Heritage Commission, City of Los Angeles.
 
Erected 2008 by City of Los Angeles. (Marker Number 920.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Asian AmericansChurches & ReligionLandmarks. In addition, it is included in the City of Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monuments series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1920.
 
Location. 34° 3.011′ N, 118° 14.35′ W. Marker is in Los Angeles, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker can be reached from Central Avenue north of 1st Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 152 N Central Ave, Los Angeles CA 90012, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonel Ellison Onizuka (approx. 0.2 miles away); Los Angeles Star (approx. 0.3 miles away); St. Vibiana’s Cathedral (approx. 0.3 miles away); Bella Union Hotel Site (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Lindbergh Beacon
Aoyama Tree and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 10, 2021
2. Aoyama Tree and Marker
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(approx. 0.3 miles away); Garnier Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Chinese Massacre (approx. 0.4 miles away); Historical Site (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Los Angeles.
 
Regarding Aoyama Tree. The tree was planted by Rev. Shutai Aoyama, who founded the Koyasan Buddhist Temple, formerly located here. The tree is symbolic of the history of Japanese Americans in Los Angeles. It is located near today’s Japanese American National Museum.
 
Aoyama Tree image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 10, 2021
3. Aoyama Tree
Aoyama Tree image. Click for full size.
Public Domain, circa 1920
4. Aoyama Tree
Rev. Shutai Aoyama and the young ficus tree in the early 1920s.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 14, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 14, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.

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Oct. 25, 2021