Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hot Springs in Fall River County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD

 
 
Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker image. Click for full size.
October 17, 2021
1. Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker
Inscription.  Gigantic Mammoths, ancestors of the elephants of today, once roamed freely across the High Plains of North America. A repository of their remains, along with other prehistoric animals, lay undisturbed until their discovery over 26,000 years later, in June of 1974.

Limestone deposits beneath the Earth’s surface dissolved in water from underground springs. The land then collapsed and the resulting sinkhole filled with 95 degree water that lured mammoths to drink or feed on vegetation. Once in the water they could not go up the slippery, steep incline. Death by starvation or drowning was the fate of most animals that came to the sinkhole. Along with the mammoth, remains of the giant short-faced bear, white-tailed prairie dog, fish and other associated fauna have also been found at this site.

As centuries passed the sinkhole gradually filled. Rain, snow and wind deposited soil leaving a hill of buried skeletons. This hill remained undisturbed until 1974 when excavation for a housing project by Phil and Elenora Anderson revealed bones and tusks of these huge animals.

Reverse:
In 1975, Mammoth Site
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
of Hot Springs, South Dakota, Inc. was formed as a non-profit corporation dedicated to the preservation of the fossils, protecting and developing the site as an in-situ (bones left as found) exhibit.

The Mammoth Site is quite different from most museums. It is not merely a display of collected items; most of the excavated bones remain exactly where they were found. Visitors also witness the complete process of paleontology from start to finish. Along with the scientists, they will see for the first time bones of animals that lived before any person walked the land.

In 1980 the Mammoth Site was designated as a Registered National Natural Landmark by the Department of the Interior. The Mammoth Site of Hot Springs is truly a gift from nature--our inheritance held in trust for over 26000 years. We would diminish ourselves if we failed to perceive the historical and scientific value of this discovery.
 
Erected 1997 by the people and businesses of Hot Springs, the South Dakota State Historical Society and the South Dakota Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 680.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Paleontology. In addition, it is included in the National Natural Landmarks, and the South Dakota State Historical Society Markers series lists. A significant historical month for this entry is June 1974.
 
Location.
Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, September 6, 2015
2. Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker
43° 25.374′ N, 103° 29.022′ W. Marker is in Hot Springs, South Dakota, in Fall River County. Marker is on Bypass U.S. 18 near South 19th Street, on the right when traveling west. Located at the entrance to the parking lot of The Mammoth Site museum in Hot Springs. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1901 US18 Bypass, Hot Springs SD 57747, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sandstone Architecture of Hot Springs, SD (approx. 0.9 miles away); An Old Jail - 1888 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Leslie Jensen Scenic Drive (approx. 1.3 miles away); Hot Springs, SD (approx. 1.3 miles away); Battle Mountain (approx. 1.3 miles away); a different marker also named Leslie Jensen Scenic Drive (approx. 3˝ miles away); John Stevenson Robertson: Pioneer Horticulturalist (approx. 3.8 miles away); Fall River Falls (approx. 4.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hot Springs.
 
Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker Reverse image. Click for full size.
October 17, 2021
3. Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker Reverse
Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, September 6, 2015
4. Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker
Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker, from the west image. Click for full size.
October 17, 2021
5. Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD Marker, from the west
Mammoth Excavation Site image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, September 6, 2015
6. Mammoth Excavation Site
Mammoth Excavation Site image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, September 6, 2015
7. Mammoth Excavation Site
Mammoth Excavation Site image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, September 6, 2015
8. Mammoth Excavation Site
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 23, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 6, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 533 times since then and 22 times this year. Last updated on October 23, 2021. Photos:   1. submitted on October 23, 2021.   2. submitted on October 6, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.   3. submitted on October 23, 2021.   4. submitted on October 6, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.   5. submitted on October 23, 2021.   6, 7, 8. submitted on October 7, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=184458

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 18, 2024