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Thomas Jay Park in Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Budd RB-1

 
 
Budd RB-1 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2021
1. Budd RB-1 Marker
Inscription.  
Budd
RB-1
Conestoga
Transport
1944-1945
Donated by Ned Robinson

 
Erected by Pima Air & Space Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Air & Space.
 
Location. 32° 8.303′ N, 110° 52.03′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima County. It is in Thomas Jay Park. Marker can be reached from East Valencia Road, 0.3 miles west of South Wilmot Road. The marker is located in the southeastern section of the Pima Air & Space Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6000 East Valencia Road, Tucson AZ 85756, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cessna U-3A (310) (a few steps from this marker); Northrop YC-125A (a few steps from this marker); Piper U-11A (PA-23) (within shouting distance of this marker); Martin 404 (within shouting distance of this marker); World War II Memorial Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Westland HMA.8 (within shouting
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distance of this marker); Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird (within shouting distance of this marker); Grumman OV-IC (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the outside section of the Pima Air & Space Museum. There is an entry fee required to visit both the inside and outside sections of the museum.
 
Regarding Budd RB-1. The aircraft could accommodate: 24 paratroopers, or 24 stretchers and 16 sitting wounded, or 9,600 pounds of cargo, or a 1½ ton truck, or the largest ambulance in use by the U.S. military.
 
Also see . . .  Budd RB Conestoga.
The RB-1/C-93 was radical for its day, introducing many of the features now standard in military transports. The flight deck could accommodate three crew members, pilot and copilot side-by-side, the navigator behind them. Stairs connected the flight deck to the cargo area, which was 25 feet (7.6 m) long with an unobstructed cross-section of 8 × 8 feet (2.4m) throughout its length. Cargo loading and unloading could be accomplished in two ways: through 40 × 60 inch
The Budd RB-1 and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2021
2. The Budd RB-1 and Marker
(102 × 152 cm) doors on both sides of the fuselage or by an electrically operated 10 × 8 foot (3.0 × 2.4 m) ramp at the aft end of the cargo area under the upswept tail, a similar development to what had been initially fitted to the Germans' own Ju 90 four-engined transport aircraft as their Trapoklappe ramp in 1939. The RB-1's loading ramp, accessed by manually operated clamshell doors, along with the tricycle landing gear, meant cargo could be loaded/unloaded at truck-bed height. A manually operated two-ton (907 kg) hoist for unloading trucks and a one-ton winch for pulling cargo up the ramp were also provided in the cargo area. Source: Wikipedia
(Submitted on November 11, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The Budd RB-1 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2021
3. The Budd RB-1
A U.S. Navy Budd RB-1 Conestoga (BuNo 39295) in flight, circa in June 1944. image. Click for full size.
Public Domain - U.S. Navy, circa 1944
4. A U.S. Navy Budd RB-1 Conestoga (BuNo 39295) in flight, circa in June 1944.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 11, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 122 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 11, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 14, 2024