Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Thomas Jay Park in Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Boeing KC-97G

 
 
Boeing KC-97G Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2021
1. Boeing KC-97G Marker
Inscription.  
Boeing
KC-97G
Stratofreighter
Aerial Tanker
1950-1978
On loan from the
National Museum
of the United States Air Force

 
Erected by Pima Air & Space Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Air & Space.
 
Location. 32° 8.445′ N, 110° 52.286′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima County. It is in Thomas Jay Park. Marker can be reached from East Valencia Road, 0.3 miles west of South Wilmot Road. The marker is located in the western section of the Pima Air & Space Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6000 East Valencia Road, Tucson AZ 85756, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Boeing KB-50 J (within shouting distance of this marker); Grumman E-1 (within shouting distance of this marker); Boeing EC-135J (within shouting distance of this marker); Grumman S2F-1S1(S-2F) (within shouting distance of this marker); Fairey AEW.3 (within shouting distance of this marker);
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Boeing C-97G (within shouting distance of this marker); Douglas EA-IF (within shouting distance of this marker); Lockheed AP-2H Neptune (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the outside section of the Pima Air & Space Museum. There is an entry fee required to visit both the inside and outside sections of the museum.
 
Also see . . .  Boeing KC-97 Stratofreighter.
The KC-97 Stratofreighter was an aerial refueling tanker variant of the C-97 Stratofreighter (which was itself based on the Boeing B-29 Superfortress), greatly modified with all the necessary tanks, plumbing, and a flying boom. The cavernous upper deck was capable of accommodating oversize cargo accessed through a very large right-side door. In addition, transferable jet fuel was contained in tanks on the lower deck (G-L models). Both decks were heated and pressurized for high altitude operations. Source: Wikipedia
(Submitted on November 13, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The Boeing KC-97G and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2021
2. The Boeing KC-97G and Marker
The Boeing KC-97G image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2021
3. The Boeing KC-97G
A Boeing KC-97L Stratofreighter refueling two U.S. Air Force Vought A-7D Corsair IIs image. Click for full size.
Public Domain - US Air Force photo - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Alaniaris, 1972/1976
4. A Boeing KC-97L Stratofreighter refueling two U.S. Air Force Vought A-7D Corsair IIs
A Missouri Air National Guard Boeing KC-97L Stratofreighter of the 180th Air Refueling Squadron, 139th Air Refueling Group, refueling two U.S. Air Force Vought A-7D Corsair IIs of the 23rd Tactical Fighter Wing, based at England Air Force Base, Louisiana (USA). The 23rd TFW flew the A-7D from 1972 to 1981, the 139th ARG retired its KC-97Ls in 1976. The Stratofreighter 53-0283 (Boeing c/n 17065) was loaned to Japan on 4 May 1965. It was returned to the USAF on 23 April 1970 and converted to a KC-97L. Later it was put on display at NAS JRB Forth Worth (Texas). Bought by a private party in December 2001, it was trucked to Colorado Springs (Colorado) and used for a restaurant.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 14, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 13, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 239 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 14, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=185740

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 17, 2024