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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Old Government House

 
 
The Old Government House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 11, 2022
1. The Old Government House Marker
Inscription.  The Old Government House, built in 1801, is one of the oldest remaining public buildings in Augusta. The original building consisting of the central block of the structure only, housed the seats of local government. It was sold to Mayor Samuel Hale in 1821 who turned it into a private residence. Since then it has housed many prominent Augustans who were responsible for turning the staid courthouse into a gracious home. The home owners included Dr. Eugene Murphey, a well-known physician and humanist whose family resided at the Telfair address for 75 years. The house was owned by the Junior League and Historic Augusta from the 1950's to the 1970's and was the setting for many weddings, parties and meetings. The City of Augusta acquired the building and renovated it in 1988 to again act as a reception facility.

The home today is a combination of architectural styles dating from the early to late 19th century representing the many families who put their personal touches on the house. Of particular interest are the Regency style wrought iron and Greek revival door moldings on the exterior. The interior features Greek revival
The Old Government House National Register plaque image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 11, 2022
2. The Old Government House National Register plaque
Click or scan to see
this page online
doors and marble fireplaces, intricate Victorian ceiling molding and stairs, and two striking gold gilt pier mirrors & cornice boards, circa 1840. Also notice the large ginko tree to the right of the house. It is the second largest of its kind in the U.S., and legend has it that the tree was planted to commemorate George Washington's visit to the site in 1791.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureGovernment & Politics. A significant historical year for this entry is 1801.
 
Location. 33° 28.157′ N, 81° 57.552′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker is at the intersection of Telfair Street and Courthouse Lane, on the right when traveling east on Telfair Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 432 Telfair St, Augusta GA 30901, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Amanda America Dickson Toomer (within shouting distance of this marker); Home of Nicholas Ware (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. James United Methodist Church (about 500 feet away); Veterans of All Wars (about 700 feet away); The Riot of May 11-12, 1970 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Birthplace of the Augusta Chronicle (approx. 0.2 miles away); Richmond County (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bicentennial Augusta, Ga (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Augusta.
 
The Old Government House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 11, 2022
3. The Old Government House Marker
Featured marker is on the right.
The Old Government House image. Click for full size.
Via City of Augusta Parks and Recreation Department (Public Domain), March 20, 2008
4. The Old Government House
The Ginkgo Tree image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 11, 2022
5. The Ginkgo Tree
The plaque at the base of the tree reads:
Ginkgo
Ginkgo biloba
Legend has it that
the tree was planted
to commemorate
George Washington's
visit to this site
in 1791
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 17, 2022. It was originally submitted on June 17, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 17, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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Aug. 12, 2022