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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hubbardton in Rutland County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Dawn Attack

 
 
Dawn Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
1. Dawn Attack Marker
Inscription.  

Directly ahead, through the gap in the hills, ran the Military Road which connected the American garrison at Mount Independence on Lake Champlain with sites on the Connecticut River. American forces used this road as their escape route during their retreat from Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence. It was in this gap that the American pickets fired on the British scouts at about 5 a.m. on the morning of July 7, 1777. This marked the beginning of the battle.

Down the valley below, the Military Road crossed Sucker Brook where sick and wounded soldiers had encamped the night before the battle. Colonel Nathan Hale had been left in charge of this group of invalids. The main part of his 2nd New Hampshire regiment was encamped to the west of this group.

Heavy fighting started at about 7 a.m. Major Robert Grant and an advance British force attacked the Americans encamped near Sucker Brook where Grant was killed. Some of the Americans, who had gone down into the valley to assist the American soldiers encamped there, retreated back to the top of the hill where you are now standing.
 
Erected by
Military Road Gap image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
2. Military Road Gap
The gap in the mountains in this photo, taken from in front of the marker, is the location of the military road from Mount Independence.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Revolutionary. A significant historical date for this entry is July 7, 1788.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 43° 41.802′ N, 73° 8.446′ W. Marker was in Hubbardton, Vermont, in Rutland County. Marker could be reached from Monument Hill Road, on the left when traveling north. Marker is located at the Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, along the battlefield walking trail. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Castleton VT 05735, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced. This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Beginnings of the Battle (within shouting distance of this marker); Monument Hill And The Morning Charge (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site (about 600 feet away); British Flank The Americans (about 600 feet away); British Flank Near Mt. Zion (about 700 feet away); Germans Arrive, Americans Retreat
Military Road image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
3. Military Road
This photo looks down the military road in the direction of Mount Independence. The retreating Americans followed this road to Hubbardton.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Hubbardton Battle Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battle of Hubbardton (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hubbardton.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker contains a picture landscape. Indicated in the picture are landmarks such as Sucker Brook and the gap where the Military Road ran.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers tell the story of the Battle of Hubbardton.
 
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
4. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site
Marker is on the battlefield walking trail in Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 13, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 12, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,495 times since then and 3 times this year. Last updated on July 11, 2022, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 12, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 7, 2023