Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hill City in Pennington County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

BNSF Railroad Signal

 
 
BNSF Railroad Signal Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
1. BNSF Railroad Signal Marker
Inscription.  This signal was retired from service on the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway, Powder River Division, Butte Subdivision, Milepost 400 in Marsland, Nebraska on August 10, 2011. The Butte Subdivision is part of BNSF Railway's coal loop which operates in the states of Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nebraska.

Much like a traffic light.

Railroad signals control train traffic much like traffic signals control vehicle traffic. There are a few differences. Both signals have green, yellow, and red lights but the order is different. On a traffic signal red is on top and green is on bottom. With railroad signals green is on top, red on bottom. There are some differences in what the colors mean as well. On railroad signals green means proceed, flashing yellow means proceed and pass next signal not exceeding 40 mph, yellow means slow down to 30 mph and prepare to stop at next signal, red means stop.

Railroad signals fall mainly into two categories, absolute and intermediate. An absolute signal governs a train's movement across a plant containing switches where a train can change tracks or through an intersection where two
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
trains can meet. These plants are called control points. Absolute signals are remotely controlled by a control operator or train dispatcher. Intermediate signals are located between control points and are used to provide safe separation between trains. Intermediate signals operate automatically as a train moves down the track.

So, what kind of signal is this?

This signal is an intermediate. Intermediate signals are identified by the presence of number boards. In this case the numbers 14000 and 14001. Each number has special identifying characteristics. In the number 14000 the first digit, one, identifies this as a main track one signal. If this signal were on single track this number would not apply. The next three digits, four hundred, identify the railroad milepost of the signal. The last digit, zero, has two meanings tenth of mile and direction. If the last digit is even it is an East or Northbound signal, if odd it is a West or Southbound signal. This signal is bi-directional so one side is marked even the other odd.
 
Erected by BNSF Railroad.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars. A significant historical date for this entry is August 10, 2011.
 
Location. 43° 55.895′ N, 103° 34.428′ W. Marker is in Hill City, South Dakota, in Pennington County
BNSF Railroad Signal Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
2. BNSF Railroad Signal Marker
. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Railroad Avenue and Elm Street. The marker is located at the central section of the 1880 Train - Hill City Depot. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 222 Railroad Avenue, Hill City SD 57745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Semaphore & Telegraph (within shouting distance of this marker); Hill City Depot (within shouting distance of this marker); The Black Hills Central Railroad (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Von Woehrman Building (about 600 feet away); The Steam Locomotive (about 600 feet away); Black Hills Central Railroad's Famous Engine #7 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hill City (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Little White Church (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hill City.
 
Also see . . .
1. 1880 Train History. (Submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
2. North American railroad signals. Wikipedia (Submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the BNSF Railroad Signal Marker from the parking lot image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
3. The view of the BNSF Railroad Signal Marker from the parking lot
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 25, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 301 times since then and 131 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=202702

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 15, 2024