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Hill City in Pennington County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Steam Locomotive

1814

 
 
The Steam Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
1. The Steam Locomotive Marker
Inscription.  The strength of the steam engine is its ability to convert raw heat into mechanical work. The first Steam Locomotive Engine was designed by George Stephenson in 1814 at the age of 20. The diagram shows major components of a piston steam engine, which would be typical in a steam locomotive.

Captions
Upper Right: Black Hills Central #110, built in 1928

Lower Right:
Steam Engine Operation
The engine shown is a double-acting steam engine because the valve allows high-pressure steam to act alternately on both faces of the piston.
You can see that the slide valve is in charge of letting the high-pressure steam into either side of the cylinder. The control rod for the valve is usually booked into a linkage attached to the cross-hegd, so that the motion of the cross-head slides the valve as well. (On a steam locomotive, this linkage also allows the engineer to put the train into reverse.)

The exhaust steam simply vents out into the atmosphere. This fact explains two things about steam locomotives:
• It explains why they have to take
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on water at the station. The water is constantly being lost through the steam exhaust.
• It explains where the "choo-choo" sound comes from. When the valve opens the cylinder to release its steam exhaust, the steam escapes under a great deal of pressure. and makes a "choo!" sound as it exits. When the train is first starting, the piston is moving very slowly, but then as the train starts rolling the piston gains speed. There is one revolution of the driving wheels for every four exhausts. The effect of this is the "Choo... choo.... choo... choo choo choo-choo" that we hear when it starts moving.
• On a steam locomotive, the cross-head links to a main rod, and from there to side rods that drive the locomotive's wheels.

 
Erected by 1880 Train - Hill City Depot.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars. A significant historical year for this entry is 1814.
 
Location. 43° 55.989′ N, 103° 34.38′ W. Marker is in Hill City, South Dakota, in Pennington County. Marker is at the intersection of Railroad Avenue and Elm Street on Railroad Avenue. The marker is located at the northern section of the 1880 Train - Hill City Depot. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 222 Railroad Avenue, Hill City SD 57745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Black Hills Central Railroad (about 300 feet
The Steam Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
2. The Steam Locomotive Marker
away, measured in a direct line); Black Hills Central Railroad's Famous Engine #7 (about 300 feet away); Hill City Depot (about 400 feet away); Semaphore & Telegraph (about 400 feet away); BNSF Railroad Signal (about 600 feet away); Von Woehrman Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hill City (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Little White Church (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hill City.
 
Also see . . .
1. 1880 Train History. (Submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
2. Steam locomotive. Wikipedia (Submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the Steam Locomotive Marker next to the railroad image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
3. The view of the Steam Locomotive Marker next to the railroad
The Steam Locomotive getting water image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
4. The Steam Locomotive getting water
The Steam Locomotive image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, June 17, 2022
5. The Steam Locomotive
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 25, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 110 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 25, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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May. 18, 2024