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Salado in Bell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

James Anderson

May 17, 1800 - Dec 25, 1865

 
 
James Anderson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
1. James Anderson Marker
Inscription.  James Anderson and his wife, Elizabeth Caroline Barnard, natives of Buncombe County, North Carolina, married there in 1821 The couple had 15 children. Anderson was a farmer and in 1835 migrated to Missouri. He joined the Mercer Colony and migrated to Texas in 1844. He received a land grant of 640 acres in East Texas. Due to boundary disputes he moved to the Milam District which later became Bell County. They lived near Bryant's Fort and Anderson served as postmaster. He purchased land near Little River. In 1850, when Bell County was organized, he was the first elected Justice of Peace and served until his death in 1865.

When Salado College and the Town of Salado were established in 1859, Anderson was one of the first to purchase a lot sold to raise money for the new College. He then built his home on Main Street in 1860. The home has been preserved and is recognized as a Texas Historic landmark. In Salado, Anderson joined Dr. Kendrick in organizing the first church in Salado, the Church of Christ, and served as an Elder until his death. Anderson also served as trustee in small schools established in homes and churches around Salado.

James
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Anderson is buried near this site; the actual gravesite is unknown.
 
Erected by MaryBelle Brown, great-great-granddaughter of James Anderson.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Settlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1821.
 
Location. 30° 56.188′ N, 97° 31.906′ W. Marker is in Salado, Texas, in Bell County. Marker is at the intersection of Baines Street and Salado Oaks Drive, on the right when traveling north on Baines Street. The marker is located in the northern section of the Salado Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 816 Baines St, Salado TX 76571, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. James Lowry Smith (a few steps from this marker); Hermon and Margaret L. Aiken (a few steps from this marker); George Washington Baines (a few steps from this marker); Dr. Welborn Barton and Louisa Adeline Barton (within shouting distance of this marker); Capt. Milton Wesley Damron (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rev. James E. and Fannie F. Ferguson (within shouting distance of this marker); Robert Bonner Halley (within shouting distance of this marker); Salado Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salado.
 
Also see . . .
James Anderson Marker on the ground image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
2. James Anderson Marker on the ground
 Mercer Colony. Texas State Historical Association
The Mercer colony was located in north central Texas east and south of the Peters colony. It lay roughly between the Brazos and Sabine rivers, north from Waco to McKinney in Collin County, skirting to the south and east of what is now the Dallas metropolitan area. Its boundaries encompassed portions of eighteen future Texas counties. The colony grew out of a statute enacted by the Texas Congress on February 4, 1841, restoring the Mexican policy of granting empresario contracts to persons who promised to settle individuals and families on the unclaimed public land of the republic. In spite of growing opposition to such contracts, President Sam Houston granted Charles Fenton Mercer a contract to settle at least 100 families a year for five years, beginning on January 29, 1844. Mercer soon organized a company, the Texas Association, to advertise and promote colonization, and sold shares at $500 each to investors in Virginia and Florida as well as in Texas.
(Submitted on August 6, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The James Anderson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
3. The James Anderson Marker
The view of the James Anderson Marker from the cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
4. The view of the James Anderson Marker from the cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 6, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 6, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 102 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 6, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jul. 24, 2024